Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Other Opinions

 
Thursday, November 29, 2007

Give a Little... or a Lot: Holiday Benefits And Places To Donate

Other Opinions Lynn Gerow It’s the season of giving, and if you’d like to make a difference in the region this year, there are plenty of opportunities. Following are some of the organizations seeking your help in order to help others throughout Northern Michigan:
 
Wednesday, October 3, 2007

Drinking: Is it really worth it?

Other Opinions Scott Straley In reference to the cover story titled “The Drinking Debate,” I doubt that I am a minority of one in believing it is utterly wasteful to devote that much time, ink, and paper to questioning the illegality of 18-20-year-olds drinking alcohol. This is a truly somnolent non-issue (at best). I did not lose one second of the sleep that was induced by Mr. Coates’s article over the fact that members of society’s most reckless, immature, irresponsible, hormone-inflamed age-group are, by law, encouraged to remain sober until they reach the ripe old age of 21. Do the people of this town wash down so many handfuls of pharmaceutical narcotics with martinis that this is what passes for a “social problem” around here?
As of today, people have to live a whopping 21 years before Big Brother allows them to use their bodies and brains for alcoholic chemistry/biology experiments! Doesn’t it just bring tears to your eyes? Aren’t you just sobbing uncontrollably? How can we, as a free people in a free country, stand idly by and allow such callous injustice to flourish in This Great Land of Ours? Let’s have a shot and a beer and go to war over this, and forcibly take this asylum back from the lunatics! Am I just oozing disingenuousness, or is this more like coarse sarcastic rancor?
You make the call.
 
Thursday, September 6, 2007

Journey into manhood

Other Opinions Nathan Wildman I don’t know when exactly it was that I became a man -- I just know that at the age of 27, I have become one. Like so many men and boys in our culture, my transition into adulthood is blurred. With roughly 50% of marriages ending in divorce and a growing number of fatherless children being raised, there is a lack of a Rite of Passage into manhood for most of us. Instead, we are left to figure it out for ourselves. Some of us look for milestones to tell us when we’re men; for example: graduation, driver’s license, sexual maturity, the drinking age, buying your first house, marriage, etc.

I have gone through each of these “Rites” and cannot tell you which one of these defined it. Yet I know that I am a man. This revelation of my manhood came to me the other day. I was just standing there watching my three-year-old princess run laps around the cul-de-sac at the end of our neighborhood, when BAM! It fell on me heavily. You are a man Nathan. The idea stuck with me -- I am. But when did it happen?

 
Thursday, August 30, 2007

Where is the antiwar movement?

Other Opinions Steve Morse As we approach the end of the fifth summer we’ve been at war in Iraq and Afghanistan, it’s evident that virtually no progress has been made toward effecting a cease-fire, not to mention a lasting peace. And, what is worse, there is no end in sight — notwithstanding that the American people voted to replace the Republican-held Congress with Democrats who, we thought, looked favorably upon ending the conflict.
It’s now clear that following the 2006 mid-term elections, after having been repeatedly lied to for six years by the Republican administration, the American Left was ignored and then peremptorily dumped by the Democratic leadership in the Congress. That “leadership,” which has been in office since the start of the year, is supposed to be in charge of Congress - a Congress, however, that now has a “confidence” rating of 14%, the lowest since Gallup started asking the question in 1973 and five points lower than the Republicans scored last year.
 
Thursday, August 16, 2007

Swimmers Beware/ Update

Other Opinions Chris Morey I love freediving. The fact that I can drive down to the bay and slide into that amazing universe, beneath the waves and between breaths, just blows me away every time.
As I waded out just west of the Open Space in Traverse City around 10 a.m. July 29, I felt that familiar sense of excitement. At the second sand bar I dropped my monofin and stepped into it. A short distance away, on one of the many boats moored near the beach, I overheard a woman talking loudly on a cell phone, admitting that her boat flushes directly into the bay and that her son uses it frequently.
I wondered how common that is.
I eased into the water and slipped beneath the surface. In the stillness below I aimed for deeper water and relaxed in the almost frictionless liquid blue of the bay. I barely noticed the beer cans and plastic cups strewn along the way.
 
Thursday, August 2, 2007

Ramblings of a full-time musician

Other Opinions John Ivan Greilick I’ve often wondered what it might be like to fly for a living. Over the years, I’ve allowed myself to look upon the captains and first officers of these amazing aircraft buzzing around the sky as heroes. I mean, they cram 170 people into an aluminium tube, fill the wings with kerosene that dumps into a burning can that blasts hot air into the colder, dense atmosphere, propelling us 35,000 feet into the air at 500 mph, just so we can make L.A. in under five hours. That seems to be quite an amazing accomplishment.
 
Thursday, July 26, 2007

Reaching out to the world

Other Opinions Andrea Gerring My self-imposed job this summer is to garner enthusiasm within the community and student population for a class on The Art History of Non-Western Cultures being offered this fall at North Central Michigan College in Petoskey.
In preparing to teach this class, questions arose in my mind as to why this type of class and why now? It is very evident that our neighbors on this planet in Europe, the Middle East and Far East demand our attention on a daily basis.
 
Thursday, July 12, 2007

Lincoln‘s Example... and a way out of the war in Iraq

Other Opinions Senator Carl Levin In his only term in Congress, Abraham Lincoln was an ardent opponent of the Mexican War. He introduced a series of resolutions that challenged President James Polk to show the “spot” of American soil on which Mexicans had spilled American blood, and he voted for an amendment stating that the war was “unnecessarily and unconstitutionally begun by the President.”
But when the question of funding for the troops fighting that war came, Lincoln voted their supplies without hesitation.
Sound familiar? President Bush recently vetoed a bill I helped draft because it would have required him to begin reducing U.S. force levels in Iraq within four months. In the wake of that veto, calls from those who want Congress to try to stop funding the war have grown louder.
 
Thursday, June 28, 2007

Mental Health is everyone‘s business

Other Opinions Leslie Sladek A long list of politicians and rulers throughout time have had mental health diagnoses.
At some point, most of us will suffer from stress, anxiety and/or depression. These often come with changes in one’s life; i.e., moving, childbirth, a new job; or from financial troubles, the loss of a job, friend or family member. This may be how mental illness starts out, but with proper treatment and/or medication, life returns to happy contentment again for most.
For others the symptoms are worse and mental health can be a life-debilitating event. The severity of the illness can affect not only the people themselves but their family, their ability to work or go to school, their finances, and the ability to function as they once had.
 
Thursday, June 7, 2007

Equal Justice for all?

Other Opinions Rich Robinson Michigan Supreme Court Justice Elizabeth Weaver has criticized the state’s top court because there are no explicit standards that say when a justice should disqualify himself or herself from ruling in a case.
Her reward for raising this serious question has been a series of vicious personal attacks against her that distract attention from the serious problem she has raised. Don’t be distracted. There’s a real problem.
A new report from the Justice at Stake Campaign says that state judicial elections are nastier, noisier and more expensive than ever before. Candidates for state supreme courts across the country are building ever-larger campaign accounts. And special interests spend millions of dollars that are never disclosed in any campaign finance report.
This is not a new story. It’s routine for Michigan Supreme Court candidates and their supporters to spend more than $1 million per seat in marketing the candidates. In 2000, the tab was $16 million for three seats, and more than half that spending was totally off the books.
 
Thursday, May 24, 2007

On the farm: a season for healing

Other Opinions Samantha Tengelitsch As a child, my family lived across from a cherry orchard that stretched out before our house in all directions. It swallowed the land and touched the horizon. I found endless fascination in watching tractors and workers weaving in and out of rows, moving around the evenly spaced trees dotted with blossoms in the spring and
vibrant red cherries in the heat of summer.
 
Thursday, May 3, 2007

I ain‘t a pretty boy no more

Other Opinions Roger Ebert My Ninth Annual Overlooked Film Festival opens Wednesday night at the University of Illinois at Urbana, and Chaz and I will be in attendance.
This year I won’t be speaking, however, as I await another surgery.
 
Thursday, April 19, 2007

Michigan Arts on the Ropes

Other Opinions Andrew C. Buelow Today’s creative industries need a creative workforce, and will go where it is to be found. These much-desired “knowledge workers,” in turn, tend to congregate in communities of diversity and culture.
This is the basis of the “Cool Cities” Initiative, launched by Governor Granholm in 2003. It’s a vision for fostering the use of arts and culture to transform Michigan’s cities into centers of creativity and vitality – thereby attracting the new industries that will revitalize the state’s economy.
 
Thursday, April 5, 2007

Tourism & Northern Michigan

Other Opinions Rick Coates This week, Northern Michigan feels like a ghost town as thousands from the region have headed out of state for Spring Break. Over the course of the coming weeks as school districts around Michigan take a break, hundreds of millions of dollars will leave the state, benefiting the economies of Florida, Texas, Mexico and several tropical islands.
Last week, more than 300 tourism leaders from Michigan gathered to talk about the state‘s challenged tourism economy. Depending on who does the counting, tourism is either the second or third largest industry in Michigan, so any way you look at it, tourism is important. Certainly, tourism is the backbone on the economy in Northern Michigan.
 
Thursday, March 29, 2007

Attracting the film industry brings dividends to Northern Michigan

Other Opinions Senator Jason Allen Lights, camera, action.
Thanks to the efforts of many policymakers, Michigan is becoming a more attractive place for filmmakers to consider when searching for a location to shoot motion pictures and commercials.
The competition with other states is fierce, and Michigan has taken an important step to remain a player. Considering the serious challenges facing our uncertain economy, we couldn’t afford to neglect any job providers.
In the past 15 years, the film industry has brought up to $20 million into the state in a year, but that figure dropped to around $2 million in 2006, the lowest in more than a decade.
Michigan was losing ground and something needed to be done. That’s why I strongly supported the Michigan Film Incentive. The new law gives money back to any film production company – from Michigan or elsewhere – that spends between $200,000 and $10 million in Michigan. Some companies will receive up to a 20 percent refund.
 
 
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