Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

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Other Opinions

 
Monday, September 1, 2008

Men: Feel the spirit

Other Opinions Steven Holl On the weekend of September 12-14 a group of men will gather to explore and celebrate the sacred journey of
masculinity.
Like their ancestors the world over have done for thousands of years, they will create a ritual space for inner vision and healing. Exactly what will emerge is hard to predict, but for certain it will contain the sweet and powerful nectar of a man’s heart, soul and strength.
 
Monday, August 25, 2008

May we all rest in peace ( and quiet)

Other Opinions Dale S. Scott The morning sun peaks into our bedroom window. Most noticeably during the “in between” seasons.
Early to mid-spring as the sun shines higher in the northern hemisphere, before the leaves pop out.
And in the fall after the cold wet wind has blown those same leaves from the maple trees that encroach upon our third floor love-nest from the north and east.
Once or twice each April that same east window is rattled by sleet laced winds when they seem to be trying to turn our house around or turn our gaze to the south and the approach of summer.
 
Monday, July 14, 2008

Peak oil... Be Prepared

Other Opinions Mark Nixon “If we don’t drill more, in this country, I am quite concerned about civil disturbances in our urban areas because of the price of fuel” says John Hofmeister, president of Shell Oil.
His solution, of course, is to ask our legislators to relax drilling restrictions in areas like ANWR (the Arctic refuge in Alaska) and off our coasts. Events which will send the signal that everything is back to normal and we can safely resume our excessive (patriotic?) consumption habits. And when we finally do run out of oil, in the distant future, robust American market forces will fix this temporary problem with Adam Smith’s invisible hand of the marketplace.
Price, profit incentive, and technology are all we need to correct any imbalance between supply and demand, say the oil companies. In contrast, author Richard Heinberg (“The Party’s Over,“ “Peak Everything:) takes a different and longer view: “Cheap oil is the party we’ve been enjoying for the past 150 years, and that party is coming to an end, in our lifetime. We’re going to see the end of the age of oil, and the result of that will be the end of the American way of life.”
 
Monday, June 30, 2008

Leave no child indoors, Lisa Franseen

Other Opinions PhD The evidence is in. It is more dangerous to be inside than outside. It is more dangerous to our physical and mental well-being to sit in front of the television or computer than it is to be outside watching ants.
The research is mounting and shows that indoor lifestyles correlate with obesity, depression and anxiety, stress, attention deficit, higher use of medications, and a lack of creativity, whereas spending ample time outside in natural surroundings actually protects us against such symptoms. We’re just not meant to live so cut off from what is natural.
You’d think that those of us living in Northern Michigan would “have it made,” as natural beauty and wild areas abound. But, for too many of us, our outside time still happens only between the house and our cars.
 
Monday, June 23, 2008

The other side of alimony...

Other Opinions Beth Harju I find the article of Calvin Murphy’s divorce contrary to what I have been through (“Vet must share disability with ex-wife” -- June 9).
My father was a veteran of WW II. He obviously had post-traumatic stress syndrome. During the war he was hospitalized for frozen hands and feet, “shell shock,” and a broken shoulder. Then, when a bomb went off, he was injured by shrapnel that pierced his body and they could not remove the piece that lay close to his spinal cord.
After healing, he was sent back to the Battle of the Bulge and other situations.
 
Monday, June 9, 2008

Time to regulate oil companies

Other Opinions Jim Ramelis Are we there yet? As the never ending rising price of gas and food surges onward, are we starting to get it? As the oil companies suck us dry of our blood like big fat wood ticks that won’t let go until they are gorged with our blood, are we starting to feel the pain? Are we finally starting to understand that something is terribly wrong with the way we are doing things? Is the failed notion that if we let the corporations do whatever they like, somehow everybody benefits from the “trickle down” effect, starting to sink in as a lie?
 
Monday, June 2, 2008

We need a new shade of green

Other Opinions Jeff Gibbs We live in a lite-green time. And it’s not working.Despite corporations, politicians and quite a few citizens being obsessed with going green our national, regional, and personal emissions are going up, up, and away. Every nation that signed Kyoto, including -- yes, the supposedly eco-friendly Europeans -- are headed in the WRONG direction: their greenhouse gases are rising. Indeed, the renewable energy revolution is so not working that Europe is rushing to build dozens of coal and nuclear-fired power plants
 
Monday, May 26, 2008

Deplorable: Anti-Gay group lied about its intentions in campaign

Other Opinions Steve Morse The Michigan Supreme Court ruled on May 7 that a voter-approved constitutional ban against single-sex marriage also prohibits state, county, and municipal governments and agencies, as well as state universities, from recognizing domestic partnerships to provide health insurance to the partners and families of gay workers. It was a deplorable decision.
One of the main objectives of the Michigan courts when construing provisions of the State Constitution is to determine as closely as possible what the people intended by passing the provision in the first place. This objective is reduced to the following principle of statutory construction: “When interpreting the Michigan Constitution, [the Supreme] Court’s duty is to enforce the law which the people have made, and not some other law which the words of the constitution may possibly be made to express.” -- Simple, reasonable, and to the point, you might say.
 
Monday, May 19, 2008

The gas crunch, Rep. D. Camp, Rep/ B. Stupek

Other Opinions Sen. C. Levin In the last two weeks Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi has had us voting on World Glaucoma Day, recognizing 2008 as the International Year of the Reef, and putting the House on record as supporting a National Watermelon Month. Now, we didn’t actually create a National Watermelon Month; we just said there should be one.
There is serious work to do, but it is not being done by this Congress. No wonder Americans are frustrated with Congress. So am I.
 
Monday, May 5, 2008

Slow that train down

Other Opinions Andrea Stewart All that foreign oil
controlling American soil
Look around you, it’s just bound to
make you embarrassed
Sheiks walkin’ around like kings
wearing fancy jewels and nose rings
Deciding America’s future
from Amsterdam and to Paris
And there’s a slow, slow train
comin’ up around the bend

“Slow Train” --Bob Dylan



Thirty years after Dylan recorded those words, I’m driving 55 mph down North Long Lake Road, a hilly, curvy road with a really bad surface and two school zones, and there’s a young guy in a big truck right on my tail. When I don’t speed up, he stomps on the gas, roars around me, and disappears in the distance. Less than a minute later, I pull up right behind him where he’s sitting at a dead stop at a red light. He did get there before I did, though.
I stop at the hardware store and park between two huge SUVs that dwarf my Ford Escort. They’re both empty, the owners inside the store, and they’re both idling.
I pull into the local deli behind a big truck with a plow on the front. The driver hops out and goes inside without turning off the engine. I expect him to make a quick purchase and run right back out, but am surprised to see him seated comfortably at the counter, ordering lunch, his truck rumbling away outside.
 
Monday, April 28, 2008

Time for an eco-revolution

Other Opinions Anne Stanton Imagine. Dr. Howard Tanner as czar of Michigan.
Dr. Tanner was DNR director under Governor William Milliken, and he’s utterly disgusted with what’s happened since John Engler’s first day as governor. “And what I most often hear about Governor Granholm is that at least she’s not as bad as Engler,” he said.
 
Monday, April 21, 2008

1968 & 2008: History repeats itself...mostly

Other Opinions Phillip W. Moore 2008....a year remarkably similar to 1968. Both feature an unpopular president conducting a war premised on falsehoods with no definition of victory and no end in sight. In both years we have a sitting president who could not run for re-election; a highly contested Democratic primary between a candidate with the support of the democratic establishment and a young idealistic senator taking his case directly to the people. Both elections feature a country that is deeply divided by the issues, its leadership and the direction in which it is moving. The two election years are amazingly similar.
In 1968, I was working in the anti-war presidential campaign of Senator Eugene McCarthy. I was part of a group of anti-war activists who wanted to enlist a credible candidate to run in the Democratic primary against the sitting president, Lyndon B. Johnson.
 
Monday, April 7, 2008

It‘s tax time

Other Opinions Harley L. Sachs Because of some past foreign employment records, in addition to our annual U.S. federal income tax, I get tax forms for two very small foreign pensions.
Other than actually owing nothing abroad because the sums are so small, I do get an insight into tax filing practices in Sweden and Denmark. The tax forms of both countries consist of a single sheet of paper. No, they don’t say: 1) write down everything you earned, and, 2) send it. They do have high rates for those who earn enough to pay, but that’s another story.
 
Monday, March 24, 2008

Student Frame-UP

Other Opinions Doug Stanton For the past several months, area high school teachers and I have worked to put kids into the movie mix of the State Theatre in downtown Traverse City.
Now on the third Monday of every month, you’ll see high school kids put on quite a show. They take tickets, sell popcorn, and present a student and major feature film. Prior to the curtain opening, they promote their movie pick to the local media.
 
Monday, March 17, 2008

Sewer Struggle

Other Opinions David Brigham “Never underestimate the power of a small group of committed citizens to change the world. Indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”
- Margaret Mead



A view of the bay is half the pay is no joke. People give up a lot to live here. So news stories of ordinary people standing up to fight for the purity of a creek or a river or a lake are not uncommon. We live here because we love the land. We are passionately committed to keeping pollutants out of our water. But to win takes money and the “weapon” of information.
Which brings me to the Freedom of Information Act—the paper plasma for bringing life to environmental cases. It’s a simple piece of paper that you can send to any public agency that asks for specific information. An agency might fight the release of data, but environmental information, generally, is not hard to get.
 
 
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