Letters

Letters 07-28-14

Worry About Legals

I can’t figure out what perplexes me more, the misinformation everywhere in the media or those who believe it to be true. Take the Hobby Lobby case; as a company that is primarily owned by a religious family, they felt their First Amendment rights were infringed upon by the “Affordable” Care Act...

Stop Labeling and Enjoy

I have been struggling to find a simple way of understanding for myself the concepts of conservative, liberal, and moderation as it relates to our social interactions with each other...

Proposal One & The Public Good

Are you kidding me? Another corporate giveaway with loopholes for large corporations who rule us? Hasn’t our corrupt and worthless governor done enough to raise taxes, provide corporate welfare, unjustly tax pensions, and shut down elected officials with his emergency manager racket...

The Truth About Road Workers

Apparently Mr. Kachadurian did not catch on to the fact that the MDOT Employee Memorial in Clare is a tribute to highway workers who lost their lives building our transportation systems. It was paid for by current and former MDOT employees who likely knew some of these people personally...

Idiotic and Misguided

As a seasonal resident, I always look forward to reading your paper, if only because of the idiotic letters to the editor and off the wall columns...


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Other Opinions

 
Monday, June 20, 2011

Blowing Sunshine

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle It has now been about 35 years since we first started talking about
alternatives to fossil fuels. In that three and a half decades talk is
about all we’ve done.
To be sure there has been some incre-mental progress. Solar energy
technology has improved enough that converting sunshine to power is
easier. There is significantly more wind energy. Maine, for example, has
made a genuine commitment to wind energy and is progressing apace.
Geothermal energy production, however, seems to be still in it’s embryonic
stages and the dream of hydrogen fuel cells producing nearly perpetual
energy is still just that; a dream.
 
Monday, June 13, 2011

Spinning until we‘re woozy

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Spinning Until We’re Woozy
State Senator Howard Walker votes for catastrophic cuts to public
education and then writes an op-ed piece claiming to be a big friend of
education and explaining how he actually did us a favor.
John Edwards gets indicted for felony-level campaign law violations and
then tells us he didn’t know anything about the money being funneled to
his mistress to keep her quiet and, even if he did, he broke no laws.
Sarah Palin tells us Paul Revere made his famous ride, in her version with
bells ringing and guns blazing, to warn the British. Then she makes it
worse by claiming she’s right and everybody else is wrong.
 
Monday, June 6, 2011

I hate you

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle I Hate You
Hatred is a funny thing.
It sweeps over people like a none too gentle breeze and, for most,
passes just as quickly. For others, unfortunately, it sticks like
annoying gum they can never quite scrape off the bottom of their shoe.
Some declarations of hate are easy to understand because they’re
familiar to us. The “I hate you” rants of a teenager who believes his
or her curfew is too strict. The emotional outbursts during a
contentious divorce. The deeply wounded lamentations of a crime victim
toward a criminal.
 
Tuesday, May 31, 2011

What happened??

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle What Happened?
      You might recall back on March 11 there was an earthquake off the coast of Japan that generated at least two tsunamis.  It was kind of a big deal, the worst devastation Japan had seen since World War II.  
   We were told at the time that more than 18,000 people died and thousands were still missing.  At least one and possibly three nuclear reactors suffered meltdowns or partial meltdowns.  Deadly levels of radiation were leaking into both the groundwater and ocean.  Tens of thousands of people were evacuated.  
   We had wall-to-wall coverage of it all for about a week and then it slowly slipped into the background, another milepost on the road to perpetual superficiality.  Apparently everything is fine there, now, because the national American media haven’t been much covering the story of late.  
   So, what happened?  What was the final death toll?  How many are still missing?  What’s being done for the people in the coastal areas that were obliterated?  Are they rebuilding?  What about the nuclear power plants?  Are they still spewing radioactivity? What happened to the workers who entered the plants during the meltdowns?  
   We were interested for a few days and then we moved along to something else.  
 
Monday, May 23, 2011

Catching up with the Republicans

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle t’s time for our Approximately Quarterly Almost Official Update on the
Republican presidential race. There have been some changes since last we
discussed the subject.
Let’s start with the dearly departed.
The not-quite-brave-enough who dabbled at the prospect of a run and then
ran away from it are Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour, Indiana
Congressman Mike Pence, South Dakota Senator John Thune and, most
recently, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee. All demonstrated unusual
wisdom in dropping out.
 
Monday, May 16, 2011

Modest cuts to school aid put students first

Other Opinions Howard Walker As the chair of the School Aid budget in the Senate, I take very seriously
the impact that proposed budget cuts will have on schools. Our young
people are the future of our state, and we must ensure that when they
graduate, they have the tools and knowledge necessary to succeed in the
21st century economy.
 
Monday, May 16, 2011

I heard it‘s a conspiracy

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle We all seem to love a good conspiracy. Or at least a good conspiracy theory.
If we can’t understand why something happened, or it seems just too
improbable, it usually takes no more than a few minutes before the first
conspiracy theories start cropping up on-line.
Which is not to suggest real conspiracies don’t exist. Caesar bit the
dust as a victim of a conspiracy, Jesus was captured and crucified as a
result of a conspiracy, every coup in history has resulted from a
conspiracy. One could argue that our very mortality is the result of a
conspiracy that took place in the Garden of Eden.
 
Monday, May 9, 2011

Come Home

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Come Home
Dear Mr. President:
Nicely done. We appreciate it. And we appreciate the outstanding efforts
of our intelligence community, our military and the bold members of SEAL
Team 6.
You are now hearing many voices telling you we’ve accomplished our mission
and we should bring the troops home.
 
Monday, May 9, 2011

New hope in the battle against child abuse

Other Opinions M‘Lynn Hartwell Many of us have fond memories of our childhood. We grew up feeling secure,
safe, and loved unconditionally by our parents and caregivers.
Unfortunately, this is not a reality for hundreds of children in our
region. A recent survey of the first 100 children who had been victims of
childhood sexual abuse, seen by the new Traverse Bay Children’s Advocacy
Center, had an average age of just under nine-years-old.
 
Monday, May 2, 2011

A sad state of affairs

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle A Sad State of Affairs
Our states are in a sad financial state.
At least 44 are in the red and are either in the midst of, or have already
completed, unpleasant budget debates. Collectively, those states have
deficits of somewhere around $125-$150 billion, depending on whose numbers
you believe.
 
Monday, April 25, 2011

Bad news from the Budget Wars

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Bad News from the Budget Wars
The first round of the budget wars was fun, didn’t you think?
The rhetoric was especially amusing with plenty of melodrama from both
sides. If the politicians were correct, we’re doomed. Republicans said we
were doomed if we didn’t cut at least $100 billion from the last few
months of the 2011 federal budget. Democrats said we were doomed if we
cut more than $19 billion
 
Monday, April 18, 2011

Avoiding the Trump card

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Avoiding the Trump Card
Donald Trump says he wants to be president. He hasn’t made up his mind
just yet but he’s pretty sure, should he decide to run, his victory is a
foregone conclusion.
Sigh.
Say what you want about Mr. Trump, and I’m about to, he’s not the least
bit short on self-confidence.
Many of us don’t believe he’ll run at all. With a new television program
in the works, Trump’s current blizzard of activity could turn out to be
little more than a clever publicity stunt.
 
Monday, April 11, 2011

Wrong side of the coin 4/11/11

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Wrong Side of the Coin
American presidents have a very steep learning curve when it comes to
sending our young men and women into harm’s way thousands of miles from
home. It appears they simply cannot resist the urge to prove how tough
they are.
So, now we have Libya to add to the growing list of places we just
absolutely, positively had to go and bomb.
 
Monday, April 4, 2011

Risky business 4/4/11

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Risky Business
There are three reasons Americans are skittish about nuclear power – Three
Mile Island, Chernobyl, and now, Fukushima Daiichi.
For many people, no additional evidence is required.
We got our first taste of this 32 years ago when the Three Mile Island
plant in Pennsylvania had a partial meltdown. That one was caused by a
minor mechanical glitch followed quickly by a series of human errors.
 
Monday, April 4, 2011

Seniors need to pitch in too 4/4/11

Other Opinions Michael Estes Seniors need to pitch in too
By Michael Estes
A few Lansing demonstrators hustled together by AARP and unhappy union
members to create problems at the capital don’t constitute the majority
thinking of Michigan voters and especially not seniors.
Instead of wasting a sunny spring Michigan afternoon, most seniors were
busy gainfully employed, assisting those in need or enjoying the company
of their friends and family in their retirements.
 
 
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