Letters

Letters 08-03-2015

Real Brownfields Deserve Dollars I read with interest the story on Brownfield development dollars in the July 20 issue. I applaud Dan Lathrop and other county commissioners who voted “No” on the Randolph Street project...

Hopping Mad Carlin Smith is hopping mad (“Will You Get Mad With Me?” 7-20-15). Somebody filed a fraudulent return using his identity, and he’s not alone. The AP estimates the government “pays more than $5 billion annually in fraudulent tax refunds.” Well, many of us have been hopping mad for years. This is because the number one tool Congress has used to fix this problem has been to cut the IRS budget –by $1.2 billion in the last 5 years...

Just Grumbling, No Solutions Mark Pontoni’s grumblings [recent Northern Express column] tell us much about him and virtually nothing about those he chooses to denigrate. We do learn that Pontoni may be the perfect political candidate. He’s arrogant, opinionated and obviously dimwitted...

A Racist Symbol I have to respond to Gordon Lee Dean’s letter claiming that the confederate battle flag is just a symbol of southern heritage and should not be banned from state displays. The heritage it represents was the treasonous effort to continue slavery by seceding from a democratic nation unwilling to maintain such a consummate evil...

Not So Thanks I would like to thank the individual who ran into and knocked over my Triumph motorcycle while it was parked at Lowe’s in TC on Friday the 24th. The $3,000 worth of damage was greatly appreciated. The big dent in the gas tank under the completely destroyed chrome badge was an especially nice touch...

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Other Opinions

 
Monday, February 28, 2011

A war against the middle

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle A War Against the Middle
There was a time in recent memory when expanding the middle class was considered such a good thing it was the underlying theme of almost all things political. Candidates and elected officials of all stripes promised, or at least discussed, improvements in public education, assistance for small business owners, protecting retirement programs, new technologies and job growth. In fact, we heard some of those very discussions during the 2010 campaigns.
The campaigns are now over and reality has come calling. Our newly elected leaders and their supporters have almost no interest in protecting or expanding the middle class. Quite the contrary. We are now witnessing a full-blown assault on the middle class.
 
Monday, February 21, 2011

Conservative confusion

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Conservative Confusion
The Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) just wrapped up in Washington, D.C., the city conservatives love to hate. A fine time was had by some.
These gatherings started way back in 1973, founded by the American Conservative Union, the oldest conservative membership organization in the country, and Young Americans for Freedom, a group of mostly college students. A stodgy old mainline group and another of fire breathing students made for strange political bedfellows but they shared a philosophical bent and a desire to strengthen and increase their numbers.
CPAC operated mostly in the dark for years. It wasn’t that they weren’t trying. They just couldn’t gain much traction with the media or the public. Ronald Reagan’s presidency gave them political legitimacy and power, and the advent of the internet enabled them them to increase both their reach and influence via a growing and more vocal conservative movement.
Their annual conference is now one of the signal events for serious conservatives. It’s well-publicized, well-attended and extraordinarily well-reported, especially since some of the leading lights of conservative talk radio have been featured speakers in the past.
 
Monday, February 14, 2011

JFK, Ronald Reagan and Hope

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle JFK, Ronald Reagan and Hope
The two modern ex-presidents with the most mystique both marked milestones
recently.
January was the 50th anniversary of President John Kennedy’s inauguration. And February would have been Ronald Reagan’s 100th birthday. Ironically, there were marked similarities between the dashing young liberal from Massachusetts and the dashing old conservative from California.
There is little debate that Kennedy was a different kind of president than what the country had been used to prior to 1960. Young, attractive, vibrant and with an even younger, beautiful wife he made everyone feel a little more optimistic about the future.
We liked him and wanted him to succeed.
 
Monday, February 7, 2011

Making History... for Better or Worse

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Making History... for Better or Worse


Egypt is on the brink. President Hosni Mubarak has already declared he
won’t seek reelection. By the time you read this the country may have
fallen into complete chaos or the military and police may have
ruthlessly cracked down on the demonstrators or some sort of
middle-ground sanity might have started to prevail.
 
Monday, January 31, 2011

Biggest surprises in Super Bowl History

Other Opinions George Foster Biggest Surprises in Super Bowl History 1/31/11
For me, the appeal of the Super Bowl is watching the breakout
performer who unexpectedly shines on the biggest sports stage in the
world during the first week of February. Here are the most startling
performances over the years:

 
Monday, January 31, 2011

Only One

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Only One 1/31/11

You might have noticed the early preening, posturing and positioning
for the 2012 Republican presidential primary races. The field of
likely, probable, possible and potential candidates has already grown
into quite a throng.
There’s Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty, former New York City Mayor
Rudolf Giuliani, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, former
Vice Presidential candidate and Governor of Alaska Sarah Palin,
Congresswoman Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, former Massachusetts
Governor Mitt Romney, Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels, former Senator
from Pennsylvania Rick Santorum, former Virginia Senator George Allen,
Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour and former Arkansas Governor Mike
Huckabee.
 
Monday, January 24, 2011

The sorry state of our state

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle The Sorry State of Our States 1/24/11
It’s the time of year for State of the State addresses. If they are
honest, governors old and new will offer the same stark message –
states are in deep trouble.
Despite all the talk of the federal deficit, and it’s plenty bad, many
states are now facing calamitous deficits. Unlike the Feds, states
are confronted with constitutional requirements to balance their
budgets and they can’t just borrow from China or print more money.
 
Monday, January 17, 2011

Gunfire in Tucson

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Gunfire in Tucson 1/17/11
Another inexplicable massacre of innocents followed by another
outpouring of grief followed by another round of finger pointing
followed by another extended period of hand wringing followed by...
pretty much nothing. We’re getting good at this.
Who’s to blame? Everyone? No one? We always have a line-up of
suspects at the ready.
 
Monday, January 10, 2011

Grading the President

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Grading the President
The trouble with grading a politician is the grade is pretty much
dependent on how we feel about the person being graded. Many Democrats
would have given George W. Bush an F regardless of what he did. And many
Republicans would similarly grade Barack Obama regardless of what he does.
Obama finds himself in the unenviable position of being forced to piss off
both the right and the left and move toward the middle in order to govern.
It’s a lesson quickly learned by every president but, for some reason,
never learned by either opponents or supporters.
 
Monday, January 3, 2011

Deserving the Bill of Rights

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Deserving the Bill of Rights
The Bill of Rights has, more or less, been under attack from the
second it was ratified as the first 10 amendments to the Constitution
in 1791. Introduced by James Madison, all 10 were created as a way to
protect the rights of individuals and serve as a brake against the
government.
It’s taken a real beating for the last half century or so.
The Fourth Amendment, which protects us against unreasonable searches
and seizures, was stomped on pretty good at the beginning of the
modern war on drugs.
 
Monday, December 27, 2010

Questions

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Questions
Ah, yes, a new year. Time for noisemakers and funny hats and
predictions and resolutions.
Predictions for 2011 are just downright foolish. Nobody seems to have
a clue. Even corporations big and small are playing wait-and-see,
delaying expansion and hiring plans and stockpiling cash. At least the
big corporations have been stockpiling cash.
 
Monday, December 20, 2010

Naughty & Nice

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Naughty & Nice
In addition to good little boys and girls, there are all kinds of
people out there who have been nice this year.
There are teachers, fire fighters, nurses, doctors, law enforcement
officers and military personnel.
 
Monday, December 20, 2010

Leaks don‘t kill people do, secrets do

Other Opinions Michael Moore Leaks Don’t Kill People, Secrets Do
By Michael Moore
Last week, in the Westminster Magistrates Court in London, the lawyers for
WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange presented to the judge a document from
me stating that I have put up $20,000 of my own money to help bail Mr.
Assange out of jail.
 
Monday, December 13, 2010

Donning our white apparel

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Donning our gay apparel
Traverse City has become the latest Michigan city to approve an
ordinance that prohibits discrimination against people based on their
sexual orientation. And just like in many of those other cities, a
group opposed to the ordinance is attempting to put the matter before
voters.
 
Monday, December 6, 2010

Trouble in North Korea

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Trouble in North Korea
The crazy people who run North Korea, or more to the point, the crazy
family, is at it again, lobbing artillery shells on a South Korean
island.
The Korean War, the Forgotten War, has become the Longest War, now in
its 60th year. Most of us don’t remember how or why it started and
almost no one understands what the hell is going on there now.
From 1910 until 1945, the Korean Peninsula was under the control of
the Japanese. They weren’t especially kind overseers.
 
 
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