Happy Hour

A weekly snapshot of Happy Hours around the region…


FireFly
Everyday, open-7 p.m., $1.75 highballs, $2.50 house chardonnay, $2.00 drafts, $1.00 off everything else.
310 Cass St., Traverse City

Fred's
Sunday-Thursday, 3-6 p.m., $1 off all drinks.
422 North 5th St., Roscommon

Lulu's Bistro
Thursdays, 5-9 p.m., $3 wells, $2 off drafts, select $5 wines.
213 N. Bridge St., Bellaire

Boyne River Inn
Everyday, 3-6 p.m., 1/4 off drinks.
229 Water St., Boyne City
 
Rendezvous Lounge, Odawa Casino
Thursday & Friday, $2.25 domestic drafts, $3.25 well drinks, $3.25 house wine.
1760 Lears Rd., Petoskey

Choice Bits!

Round-the-region snapshots of the dining scene. 

RUTHIE'S CHICKEN & DAIRY TWIST: Roasted chicken and ice cream, malts and shakes.
201 N. Bridge Ln., Bellaire. 213­-533­-8538.

MONEY'S PLATTE RIVER INN:
Practically an Up North institution, the place to find out the latest fishing or snowmobile news from the locals and visitors who gather for their hearty breakfasts, steaks, burgers, soup & salad bar, & homemade desserts.
10921 Main St., Honor. 231­ 352­6585.

BC LANES FAMILY ENTERTAIMENT CENTER:
When you've worked up an appetite from all the bowling and karaoke that Boyne City Lanes has to offer, you'll find a selection of hearty fare to choose from, including homemade soups & desserts. Cocktails are served at the Lanes,with live entertainment and glow ­bowling nights.
1199 West Boyne Road, 231-­582­-6353.

CHINA ONE:
Open 7 days a week for lunch & dinner. Full Chinese menu, as well as Hunan & Szechuan entrees.  Daily specials, special combination plates,  a lunch & dinner All You Can Eat Buffet. 
616 S. Mitchell St., Cadillac, 231­-876­-8888.

A&W:
Take a trip back to the '50s where chili dogs & frosted mugs of root beer are still served up by carhops at this All ­American institution. Elvis has been known to make an appearance during their annual summer “A&W Cruise Night” in August, as do cars from the 50’s and 60’s that we remember well.
At the bottom of the hill, 21 Lake St., Frankfort,  231-­352-­9021.

BIG BUCK BREWERY & STEAKHOUSE:
From Antler Ale to Wolverine Wheat, Big Buck specializes in microbrewed beers. Offering the usual beef and buffalo burgers, steaks, and ribs, plus more unusual fare, like their portabella sandwich with red onion marmalade and provolone cheese.
550 S. Wisconsin Avenue, Gaylord, 989­-732-­5781.

THE NEW YORK RESTAURANT:
A refined atmosphere, subdued lighting, and an appetizing selection of epicurean treats awaits the diner at this Harbor Springs corner landmark. Menu selections range from their smoked whitefish ravioli appetizer to their Atlantic salmon, baked polenta and eggplant, tomato basil fettuccine, or filet mignon ­ and their brunches include one of the best versions of Eggs Benedict around.
101 State Street, downtown across from Bar Harbor, 231­-526-­1904.

EMPIRE VILLAGE INN: 
Pool tables, a full bar, friendly service and a varied menu make the Village Inn popular with families and locals.  Dinners include Lamb Skewers, Blue Corn Enchiladas, Charbroiled Whitefish, Lasagna and Ribeye.  Also burgers, sandwiches, salads, appetizers and pizza.  Lunch and Dinner.
Just north of the blinking light 116601 Lacorre Ave. on M­22,  Empire. 231-326­-5101.

JESPERSON'S:
One of Petoskey's first restaurants, Jesperson's is famous for homemade pies and fresh turkey. Breakfast and lunch.
312 Howard, Petoskey, 231­-347­-3601.
 
CUPPA JOE:
Located in Building 50, grilled panini's, soups, wraps, baked goods, specialty coffees and teas.
1200 W. 11th St., Traverse City, 231-­947­-7740.

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Dining

 
Monday, September 27, 2010

South American Grille

Dining Kristi Kates “In spite of the hard times during the Great Depression, some people
vacationed by taking a cruise on the Great Lakes on the S.S. South
American,” explains Russell D. Miller III, Executive Chef for the
South American Grille at Bay Harbor.
 
Monday, September 20, 2010

Tastemakers: Chili By The BAy/ Spaten Oktoberfestbier Ur- Marzen

Dining Rick Coates Chili by The Bay
It is tailgate season and that means a lot of secret chili recipes will find their way to many stadium parking lots. Legend has it that chili originated in Texas sometime in the early 1800s by cowboys who drove cattle through the plains and needed simple meals. One theory is that cooks traveling in these cattle caravans planted oregano, chiles, and onions among patches of mesquite to protect them from foraging cattle. The next time they passed the same trail, they would collect the spices, combine them with beef, and make a dish called “Trail Drive Chili”.
In the Midwest, Cincinnati chili is the regional favorite. Typically “Cincinnati-style chili uses unique ingredients such as chocolate, cinnamon or cloves and typically does not use chili powder or chili peppers. It is usually served over spaghetti, hot dogs, chili or chips.”
Traditional dishes include two-way: spaghetti and chili; three-way: spaghetti, chili, and shredded cheese; four-way: spaghetti, chili, shredded cheese, and either diced onions or beans; five-way: spaghetti, chili, shredded cheese, diced onions, and beans.
 
Monday, September 20, 2010

Oryana

Dining Erin Cowell Growing Self Reliance: Oryana’s Toast to Farmers features ‘localism’ expert
By Erin Crowell
The early morning stirs with the busyness of shoppers at a local
farmers market. Goods are strewn about tables, stacked in bushels and
overflowing rims of wicker baskets. There’s a sense of connection,
optimism and energy flowing through the crowd of vendors and
customers.
 
Monday, September 20, 2010

Follow True North to The Compass Room

Dining Kristi Kates Follow True North to The Compass Room
By Kristi Kates
“I think the Compass Room is very much an integral part of the experience here at True North,” says John Hover of True North Resort and Golf Club. “Many golfers like to relax after their game and talk about their round, and often food is a part of that.”
The Compass Room, True North’s casual fine dining experience, was opened based on a simple requirement for all golf courses to have food and beverage service, “because the normal golf outing takes five to six hours from arrival to departure,” Hover says.
 
Monday, September 13, 2010

Monty‘s maximum BBQ

Dining Kristi Kates Monty’s Maximum B.B.Q. brings new zing to Boyne City
By Kristi Kates
Monty Wilhelm, a 25-year restaurant/hospitality veteran, is a barbecue believer.
“Everyone loves B.B.Q.,” he states.
Wilhelm, who recently opened the Boyne City restaurant that’s simply been dubbed The B.B.Q., brings a wealth of experience to his role as new restaurant owner, and is bringing an extensive menu of barbecued dishes to the also newly-revitalized downtown Boyne City neighborhood. It’s a match made in barbecue-sauce heaven.
 
Monday, September 13, 2010

Tastemekers: Great Lakes Chip Company/ Bell‘s 25th anniversary

Dining Rick Coates Great Lakes Chip Company
America’s number one snack food? The potato chip of course. According to potato chip folklore this crunchy snack and sandwich side was developed purely by accident. In the summer of 1853, Native American George Crum was employed as a chef at an elegant resort in Saratoga Springs, New York. A dinner guest was upset with the thickness of Crum’s french fries and sent them back.
Crum in turn was upset and decided to send out the thinnest fries he could make, the guest was ecstatic over the browned, paper-thin potatoes and word began to spread about Crum’s “potato chips.”
Michigan is one of the top producers of potatoes grown for potato chips and Traverse City entrepreneurs Chris and Ed Girrbach (of Pangea’s restaurant in Traverse City) decided to take advantage of the crop. Earlier this summer they launched the Great Lakes Potato Chip Company. Not only are they using local potatoes and seasonings, they are manufacturing and distributing their chips from a production company at the base of the Leelanau Peninsula.
 
Monday, August 30, 2010

Tastemakers: Hilbert‘s Money/ 231 Harvest Signiture Cocktail

Dining Rick Coates 231 Harvest Signature Cocktail
The Evening with Mario Batali in Traverse City a few weeks ago attracted
2,000 guests who dined on Batali recipes prepared by the chefs from The
Cooks’ House and Epicure Catering. While the food was exceptional and the
culinary teams are to be commended for preparing 10 recipes to perfection,
equally impressive was the 231 Harvest Signature Cocktail introduced that
evening.
 
Monday, August 30, 2010

Willow Mercantile

Dining Al Parker Willow Mercantile brings farm-fresh foods to Cadillac
By Al Parker
A pair of energetic entrepreneurs have taken a shabby location on Cadillac’s South Mitchell Street and turned it into a bustling produce and specialty market that lures shoppers from across the region with its fresh produce, extensive roster of Michigan products and on-site greenhouse.
 
Monday, August 30, 2010

The Rowe Inn

Dining Kristi Kates Bienvenue! A touch of Provence inspires The Rowe Inn
By Kristi Kates
You‘ll find some of Northern Michigan‘s most cherished dining traditions at The Rowe Inn in Ellsworth -- a restaurant that pioneered fine dining, ethnic foods and the “fresh is best“ ideals in the region.
“I grew up in my parent’s restaurant, starting as a dishwasher at the age of 10,“ The Rowe Inn‘s proprietor Albert “Wes“ Westhoven says. “My father was a gifted chef committed to the concept of ‘fresh and from scratch,‘ and I learned my cooking skills from him.“
 
Monday, August 23, 2010

Tastemakers: Hall‘s sweet corn/ Frankenmuth Brewery

Dining Rick Coates Hall’s Sweet Corn
Northern Michigan sweet corn is making the headlines this summer. Scientists released a study earlier this summer attributing the Michigan corn crop to lower summertime temperatures. Climatologists claim that the increase in corn crops in Michigan over the past 60 years increases the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere, resulting in cooler temperatures. In other words, our summer might have been even hotter this year, if it weren’t for all the corn grown in Michigan.
Okay, that is way too much science for something that tastes so good. The sweet corn crop in the region is in full harvest. Last week I was at the Traverse City Farmers’ Market and there was a crowd gathered around Hall’s and their giant trailer full of sweet corn. I asked one person in line about it who said Hall’s is the “best anywhere and I come every Wednesday and Saturday to get it.”
Well, when I loaded up my bag and went to pay, I asked for the secret to their success and the young woman just smiled and said, “It is all in the water, that’s all I am saying.”
 
Monday, August 23, 2010

Da Dawg House

Dining Al Parker Da Dawg House offers Dining in a Dog Dish
By Al Parker
It’s a mid-summer, mid-morning in Cadillac, a time when a lot of
breakfast joints are starting to slow down a bit after the breakfast
rush.
 
Monday, August 16, 2010

Tastemakers: Traverse City Wine & Art Festival

Dining Rick Coates Traverse City Wine & Art Festival
A couple of weeks ago I attended the Paella in the Park in Traverse City and a friend of mine from out of state joined me. He laughed when I told him it was all local wine from the Old Mission Peninsula. But I countered, listing the major awards wineries in the region have won at international tasting competitions. He came back with a response I hear a lot: “Okay, so you make great white wines up here, but I am a red wine drinker and your reds...” Before he could finish I escorted him to the Peninsula Cellars table so he could taste their 2005 Cabernet Franc.
 
Monday, August 16, 2010

Jolly‘s in Petoskey

Dining Kristi Kates Cookie Magic: Jolly’s opens in Petoskey
By Kristi Kates
“When you say the word ‘Petoskey’ downstate, it’s like throwing magic
in the air,” says Jolly’s Cookies and Cafe founder and owner Keith
Jolly. “People always get that dreamy look on their face. What’s not
to love about the Petoskey area? The scenery is spectacular, the local
people are a delight - it’s all here.”
 
Monday, August 9, 2010

An evening with Mario

Dining Rick Coates An Evening with Mario: A Reservation For 2,300, Please!
By Rick Coates
Sam Porter is fresh off his successful first-ever Paella In The Park event last Friday in Traverse City which attracted a sold-out crowd of 1,500. Porter has no time to celebrate as he conducts another first-time event, “An Evening With Mario Batali,” that is expected to attract 2,300 for dinner.
The event is being co-produced by Porterhouse Productions and the National Writers Series. It will take place on the historic front lawn of the Village at Grand Traverse Commons this Saturday, August 14, from 5 to 10 p.m. Tickets range from $35 to $99 (the more expensive the ticket the closer to the stage one sits).
“This is a very fantastic event that starts with the generosity of Mario Batali,” said Porter. “Mario is donating his time and the net proceeds will go the scholarship fund that the National Writer Series has set up.”
Porter says there are “so many aspects of this event” that he is concerned some may not understand what they get for the ticket price.
“There are several components to this evening. First all, everyone is going to be well fed as all tickets include all 10 dishes being prepared from recipes inspired by Mario’s cookbooks,” said Porter.
“There will be a cash bar that will feature local wines and beers. When you purchase your first glass of wine you keep that glass and take it home, it is really nice stemware. For the beer we have canning jars but we are asking that you donate those back as they are going to a youth program to teach canning.”
 
Monday, August 9, 2010

Chez Peres

Dining Al Parker Chez Peres offers French comfort food
By Al Parker
French cuisine often conjures up images of white linen tables, a pretentious maitre d and entrees smothered in thick, creamy, calorie-laden sauces.
Kick those concepts to the Lake Avenue curb when you visit Traverse City’s newest French bistro, Chez Peres.
“Our food is elegant, but very much down to Earth,” says chef Keil Moshier.
 
 
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