Letters

Letters 12-14-2014

Come Together There is a time-honored war strategy known as “divide and conquer,” and never has it been more effective than now. The enemy is using it against us through television, internet and other social media. I opened a Facebook account a couple of years back to gain more entries in local contests. Since then I had fallen under its spell; I rushed into judgment on several social issues based on information found on those pages

Quiet The Phones! This weekend we attended two beautiful Christmas musical events and the enjoyment of both were significantly diminished by self-absorbed boors holding their stupid iPhones high overhead to capture extremely crucial and highly needed photos. We too own iPhones, but during a public concert we possess the decency and manners to leave them turned off and/or at home. Today’s performance, the annual Messiah Sing at Traverse City’s Central Methodist Church, was a new low: we watched as Mr. Self-Absorbed not only took several photos but then afterwards immediately posted them to his Facebook page. We were dumbfounded.

A Torturous Defense In defense of the C.I.A.’s use of torture in a mostly fruitless search for vital information, some suggest that the dire situation facing us after 9-11, justified the use of torture even at the expense of the potential loss of much of our nation’s moral authority.

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Nancy Sundstrom

 
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Thursday, August 14, 2003

Goth Goes Mainstream: The Moody, Dark Look Lights up the Teen Set

Features Nancy Sundstrom It’s unthinkable to many, but horror of horrors, goth culture seems to have gone mainstream.
 
Thursday, July 31, 2003

The Late, Great Kate

Books Nancy Sundstrom Very few people in the literary world knew that an extraordinary sort of memoir had been in the works since 1983 about Katherine Hepburn by the fine biographer A. Scott Berg, the writer who had previously tackled Max Perkins, Samuel Goldwyn and Charles Lindbergh as subjects, and with resounding success.
 
Thursday, July 24, 2003

A Story of Violent Faith: Jon Krakauer Probes America‘s Version of the Taliban

Books Nancy Sundstrom Jon Krakauer is the respected author of such outdoor-based books as “Eiger Dreams,“ “Into the Wild,“ and “Into Thin Air,“ insightful stories about people who lives are pushed to the fringe of extremes. In his latest book, he moves into new literary territory in the extremes of religious belief primarily within American borders and based on the Mormon faith. The result has made for fascinating storytelling and more than a bit of controversy.
 
Thursday, July 17, 2003

The Glory of Getting Mother‘s Body

Books Nancy Sundstrom If the title alone isn’t enough to intrigue you, scan through the first few paragraphs of “Getting Mother’s Body“ by Suzan-Lori Parks. Parks is a wonderful writer whose has accomplished something quite special with this, her fiction debut, and the reader knows it almost immediately by the way her musical prose comes swinging out of the corner.
 
Thursday, July 10, 2003

Dry is Anything But

Books Nancy Sundstrom After surviving James Frey’s powerful and harrowing “A Million Little Pieces,“ I thought it might be a while before I delved into an addiction saga again, but the buzz (no pun intended) for “Dry: A Memoir“ by Augusten Burroughs has been so strong, that it looked like it shouldn’t be ignored.
 
Thursday, June 26, 2003

The Da Vinci Code is a Work of Art

Books Nancy Sundstrom Dan Brown’s “The Da Vinci Code“ is so smart and sharp that you will raise your I.Q. by reading it. And you won’t be able to stop turning the pages in the process. I promise.
 
Thursday, June 19, 2003

Cosmopolis, Anyone?

Books Nancy Sundstrom Many in the literary world wondered how Don DeLillo was going to top his last effort, the sprawling, muscular masterpiece named “Underworld.“ But we should have known to look for a surprise. In “Cosmopolis,“ his 13th novel, he spins a tale that is taught, intimate and tightly controlled. In may not be “Underworld,“ but then, what could be?
 
Thursday, June 12, 2003

Mountains of Books for Great Summer Beach Reads

Books Nancy Sundstrom There are mountains of new books that look to be great summer beach reads, so as you start listing the reasons to look forward to summer or the plans you have for the season, sizzling summer books ought to at least make a decent showing.
 
Thursday, June 5, 2003

Masters of Doom: How the Lennon and McCartney of Video Games Transformed Pop Culture

Books Nancy Sundstrom You may not know the names John Carmack and John Romero, but chances are excellent that you’ve had some kind of encounter with what they did to mastermind a major industry and shape a generation.
 
Thursday, May 29, 2003

Caramelo - As Rich, Intriguing, and Delightful as it Sounds

Books Nancy Sundstrom “Tell me a story, even if it’s a lie,“ begins “Caramelo.“ To the great delight of the reader, what author Sandra Cisneros delivers is not the latter, because feels far too real for that, but the former, in spades.
 
Thursday, May 22, 2003

Notes from the Underground

Books Nancy Sundstrom Most readers of Eric Schlosser’s 2001 best seller “Fast Food Nation“ found themselves bewildered, outraged, horrified, and called to rise up in action, and appropriately so. Those who tackle his latest expose, “Reefer Madness: Sex, Drugs, and Cheap Labor in the American Black Market“ can count on having the same sort of reaction.
 
Thursday, May 15, 2003

Take a Ride on the Baghdad Express

Books Nancy Sundstrom In the summer of 1990, writer Joel Turnipseed was adrift and aimless. He was homeless, and had been unceremoniously kicked out of a college philosophy program and dumped by his girlfriend. Being AWOL from his Marine Corps Reserve unit for more than three months and spending day after day hanging out in coffee shops were also on his list of dubious achievements.
 
Thursday, May 8, 2003

An Addict Torn into A Million Little Pieces

Books Nancy Sundstrom I don’t know whether to give this next statement a caveat, or simply make it. I have just now decided to opt for the latter.
 
Thursday, May 1, 2003

A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide

Books Nancy Sundstrom This year‘s coveted Pulitzer Prize for General Non-fiction went to Samantha Power’s “A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide,“ a gripping, heartbreaking saga of the years she spent as a journalist covering the grisly events in Bosnia and Srebrenica, circa 1993-1996.
 
Thursday, April 17, 2003

Tune In and Turn On to Drop City

Books Nancy Sundstrom Singer-songwriter Greg Brown has a wonderful line about most baby boomers being a “cross between our parents and hippies in a tent,“ and if that sentiment rings at all true for you, you’ll find it beautifully reinforced in T. Coraghessan Boyle’s fabulous new novel, “Drop City.“
 
 
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