Letters

Letters 04-14-14

Benishek Inching

Regarding “Benishek No Environmentalist” I agree with Mr. Powell’s letter to the editor/ opinion of Congressman Dan Benishek’s poor environmental record and his penchant for putting corporate interests ahead of his constituents’...

Climate Change Warning

Currently there are three assaults on climate change. The first is on the integrity of the scientists who support human activity in climate change. Second is that humans are not capable of affecting the climate...

Fed Up About Roads

It has gotten to the point where I cringe when I have to drive around this area. There are areas in Traverse City that look like a war zone. When you have to spend more time viewing potholes instead on concentrating on the road, accidents are bound to happen...

Don’t Blame the IRS

I have not heard much about the reason for the IRS getting itself entangled with the scrutiny of certain conservative 501(c) groups (not for profit) seeking tax exemption. Groups seeking tax relief must be organizations that are operated “primarily for the purpose of bringing about civic betterment and social improvements.”


Home · Articles · By Robert Downes

Robert Downes

 
Top Articles from
No articles in this section
Monday, May 2, 2011

Three cups of uproar

Random Thoughts Robert Downes Three Cups of Uproar
A tempest in a teapot for humanitarian Greg Mortenson
“When it comes right down to it I am nothing more than a fellow who took a
wrong turn in the mountains and never quite managed to find his way home.”

-- Greg Mortenson, Stones into Schools

Is author and adventurer Greg Mortenson -- who wrote Three Cups of Tea --
an outrageous liar or just a good-hearted humanitarian who happens to have
really sloppy business practices?
It depends on who you ask.
 
Monday, April 25, 2011

To the shores of Tripoli

Random Thoughts Robert Downes To the Shores of Tripoli
Here’s a Trivia Pursuit history question for you: What was the first
country to ever declare war on the United States?
The answer is the North African country of Tripoli, which is known today
as Libya.
In 1801, Tripoli had the honor of being the first nation on earth to
declare war on the youthful U.S. (The British, remember, fought a war with
their colony, not the nation that came after the Revolution.)
The war gave rise to a tale of derring-do, America’s first secret agent,
and a “special ops” mission across 500 miles of the brutal Libyan Desert
by 8 U.S. Marines to the “shores of Tripoli” in a raid to rescue 307
Americans held captive by pirates.
 
Monday, April 18, 2011

Unions under the gun

Random Thoughts Robert Downes I‘ve been a member of four unions during my life, but didn‘t always
appreciate what it meant to be part of the brotherhood of labor.
For instance, as a newly-minted member of the UAW many years ago, I
scoffed at the idea of receiving health insurance as a union benefit.
Why would I ever need such a thing? I wondered.
I was 19 at the time and health insurance was a rare and novel thing,
entirely unknown among my peers. If you weren’t a union member or a
government employee, chances are you didn’t have it.
 
Monday, April 11, 2011

Matters of style 4/11/11

Random Thoughts Robert Downes Matters of Style
Someone once said that “style is a form of limitation.” By this, I
take it to mean that Lady Gaga probably wouldn’t do well on a
camping trip in her raw meat dress or one of her spacegirl suits
because her “style” has placed limits on what she can do in a
practical sense - like canoeing or pitching a tent.
 
Monday, April 4, 2011

Exploratory surgery 4/4/11

Random Thoughts Robert Downes Exploratory Surgery
Remember the days of exploratory surgery? Probably not if you’re under the
age of 40, but in the days before the CT scan came into wide use back in
the ’70s, and certainly long before MRIs, surgeons had little choice but
to open you up and peek around at your innards if something like a tumor,
hernia, or internal bleeding was suspected.
Of course, this was a dangerous and uncertain form of diagnosis, fraught
with the risk of infection and sure to leave you with a painful surgical
wound with no guarantee that the surgeon would even find anything.
Perhaps it’s a misplaced metaphor, but I can’t help thinking that our new
Governor Rick Snyder is wearing those same bloody shoe covers in the
operating room of the state capital, trying to find out why his patient is
hemorrhaging and how to pump life back into Michigan before our state dies
on the table.
 
Monday, April 4, 2011

Bill Palladino 4/4/11

Features Robert Downes The Car-Free Life: Bill Palladino is on a roll year-round
By Robert Downes
“When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race.”
-- H.G. Wells
At a time when most of us are just starting to think about getting our bicycles out of storage, Bill Palladino is looking back on another year of riding all winter long.
Two years ago, Palladino, 52, gave up his vehicle in favor of commuting by bicycle, which has been his preferred way of getting around since his teen years.
“I had a Saturn SUV, but the car sat in the parking lot most of the time. I only used it occasionally,” he recalls. “Then my nephew called and said he needed a car. I thought about it for a bit and then flew him up from Florida and gave him the keys -- the decision was made that fast for me.
“I’m part of the pedestrian and cycling advocacy community,” he adds. “And it seemed
 
Monday, March 28, 2011

We‘ll miss Anne Stanton 3/28/11

Random Thoughts Robert Downes We‘ll miss Anne Stanton
At Anne Stanton’s farewell luncheon last week, we took some time to think back on some of the amazing stories she’s written during her seven years at Northern Express.
My personal favorite was “The Wolfman of Brethren,” in which Anne wrote of John Patrick Sutherland, who died in a hail of bullets from overzealous police officers over the attempted micro-chipping of his 14 wolf dogs in September of 2005. That story won a Michigan Press Association award in 2006.
 
Monday, March 28, 2011

Becky Thatcher 3/28/11

Features Robert Downes Becky Thatcher: Best Jeweler is also a World Traveler
By Robert Downes
Business has literally been an adventure for Becky Thatcher, who has roamed the world in search of gemstones and pearls which drape the counters of her jewelry stores around the region.
It’s this dedication to tracking down the best of the best -- even going to the far side of the world -- that earned Becky honors as “best jeweler” in Leelanau County.
Creating dazzling works of art in jewelry has been a lifelong quest.
 
Monday, March 21, 2011

American Tsunami/On Shaky Ground 3/21/11

Random Thoughts Robert Downes American Tsunami
Over the past four years, America has been swept up in its own economic
tsunami which has arguably been as devastating to our unemployed citizens
as the wreck of Japan.
Millions of jobs have been washed from our shores, but unfortunately, the
rescue has been largely impeded by ideologues on the right who are
presently in the driver’s seat in Congress. You know, the same folks who
argued that General Motors should be allowed to fail along with the
nation’s banks, forgetting that when major institutions go under, they
take us along with them.
 
Monday, March 14, 2011

Wild Kingdom

Random Thoughts Robert Downes Wild Kingdom
What’s the latest on Michigan’s wild hog crisis? Glad you asked.
Wild hogs were recently classified as an “invasive, exotic and prohibited
species” by the DNR. Outgoing director Rebecca Humphries signed the order
in December and it goes into effect on July 8, giving game ranches and
wild hog breeders time to give porky the boot. Over the years, these
outfits have allowed dangerous variants of the Russian boar to escape into
the wild, creating a virtual hog bomb.
 
Monday, March 14, 2011

The Indians in winter

Features Robert Downes The Indians in Winter:vHow they survived -- and thrived -- in a frozen land
By Robert Downes
Have you ever wondered how the Indians of Northern Michigan lived through
the cruel, cold winter months just a few generations ago?
Today, we depend on natural gas, forced-air furnaces, electric blankets,
heated cars and expensive down jackets… and still we complain of the cold
and yearn for Florida.
 
Monday, March 7, 2011

1, 000 mile hike

Books Robert Downes 1,000 Mile Hike: Loreen Niewenhuis’s walk around Lake Michigan
By Robert Downes
Loreen Niewenhuis doesn’t have much of a background as an adventurer or a
long-distance hiker, but nonetheless, in 2009 she completed a walk around
the entire circumference of Lake Michigan.
Today, the 45-year-old author from Battle Creek is on a new adventure,
embarking on a tour in support of her new book, “A 1,000-Mile Walk on the
Beach,” published by Crickhollow Books, with stops at bookstores
throughout Northern Michigan.
 
Monday, March 7, 2011

To gather no moss

Random Thoughts Robert Downes To gather no moss
Keith Richards’ new autobiography, Life, offers some insight into what
youth is capable of when the fires of a dream are lit.
“The Rolling Stones spent the first year of their life hanging places,
stealing food and rehearsing,” he writes of their early days.
It doesn’t sound like an auspicious beginning, but Richards adds that he,
Mick Jagger and fellow guitarist Brian Jones spent that entire year
dissecting the songs of American blues musicians, breaking down their
chords, leads, harmonica riffs and vocal nuances in minute detail.
“We moved in in the summer of 1962 and lived there for a year through the
coldest winter since 1740,” he writes of their flat in London, which was
“truly disgusting.”
 
Monday, February 28, 2011

Another job terminator

Random Thoughts Robert Downes Another Job Terminator
Did anyone feel a chill run down their spine last week when the IBM computer Watson obliterated “Jeopardy” champs Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter in a stunt that has profound ramifications for the human race?
No, not some kind of SkyNet “rise of the machines” fantasy with Terminators running amok. The potential damage of Watson and his ilk is to eliminate millions of jobs in the name of “progress” and “productivity.”
Some background: several years ago, IBM set out to create a computer that could process all of the foibles of human speech: our slang, double-entendres, jokes, you name it, with the test being how well this critter would do on “Jeopardy.” They created a “question answering machine” composed of 400 mainframe computers containing 3,000 computer cores and 15 trillion bytes of memory.
 
Monday, February 28, 2011

A life in balance/ Libby Robold

Features Robert Downes A LIFE IN Balance: Libby Robold’s path to happiness
By Robert Downes
You can’t help but notice that Libby Robold has that sense of inner glow
that signals not just a state of contentment, but also an excitement about
what life has yet to offer.
 
 
Close
Close
Close