Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Monday, December 28, 2009

Homeless for the Holidays/Hobo Don

Features Anne Stanton Homeless for the Holidays
An Interview with Hobo Don
By Anne Stanton
What is a hobo’s life like here in Northern Michigan at Christmastime?
You don’t have to look far to find the answer.
I first heard about “Hobo” Don Espy through Keith Schwartz, who works
at Sight and Sound at the Traverse Area District Library.
 
Monday, December 21, 2009

Couple makes Torch Lake History

Books Anne Stanton Couple Makes
Torch Lake History
By Anne Stanton
Torch Lake is known for its beauty, as well as its summer flotilla of floating parties thanks to an endless sand bar. The vast emerald blue lake is reputed to be the inspiration for Kid Rock’s hit song, “All Summer Long.”
But, ever wonder how Torch Lake got its name?
The early settlers in the area saw Native American Indians waving birch bark torches along the shoreline in order to attract fish for supper.
You’ll find that fact along with all kinds of history about the Torch Lake area in Torch Lake, The History of Was-Wah-Go-Ning, a 436-page book with stories that trace the lake’s evolution from a frozen tundra to a resort that inspires rock song lyrics of catching “walleye off a dock and watching waves roll off the rock.” The book, priced at $60, features no less than 673 maps, drawings and photographs.
The book reflects the combined efforts of Mary Kay and Edward McDuffie, a wife and husband team. Ed (known as Eb to his close friends) focused on the area’s ancient history, glaciers and maps, while Mary Kay compiled the more recent information and wrote most of the text.
 
Monday, December 21, 2009

Where in the world is Jimmy Hoffa?

Features Anne Stanton On a pretty, sunny afternoon 34 years ago, Pete Smith was at work
building a cabin in the woods north of Cadillac near M-55 and 33 Road.
Smith, a strapping 23-year-old, was running low on logs. He hopped in
his truck and went on a quiet ride down a two-track looking for more.
Twenty minutes later, he came upon a couple of well-dressed Italian
guys dressed in black.
 
Monday, December 14, 2009

Evicted at Christmas

Features Anne Stanton Evicted at Christmas
Woman with brain cancer may lose apartment over medical marijuana conflict
By Anne Stanton
A 49-year-old Elk Rapids woman suffering from brain cancer has been
threatened with eviction for growing medical marijuana in her bedroom
closet.
 
Monday, December 14, 2009

Growing up quietly/ the Hoxie family

Features Anne Stanton Growing Up Quietly
How one family met the challenge of deafness
By Anne Stanton
Christmas was a wonderful time in the Hoxsie family; the three Hoxsie
kids would get up early to shake their presents thinking their
parents, who were deaf, couldn’t hear them. But somehow they knew.
 
Monday, December 7, 2009

All in the Family? Not so says U.S. Rep. Bart Stupek

Features Anne Stanton All in The Family?
Not so says U.S. Rep. Bart Stupak
By Anne Stanton
“Pure unadulterated bullshit.”
That’s how Rep. Bart Stupak, the normally amicable U.S. Congressman from Menominee, angrily responded to accusations made last week about his relationship with the “Family.”
And Stupak clearly doesn’t like the guy making the accusations—Jeff Sharlet, who wrote the book, The Family: The Secret Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power.
On November 24, Sharlet spoke on NPR’s Fresh Air Show about the Fellowship Foundation, or what’s also called the Family, a secret, evangelical group that works with politicians and powerbrokers to promote an ultra-conservative Christian agenda. He pulled Stupak into the interview because of his recent anti-abortion amendment, which he co-sponsored with Rep. Joe Pitts, a core Family member, Sharlet said.
 
Monday, November 30, 2009

Appalachian Trail

Features Anne Stanton Loving and Loathing the Appalachian Trail
Two from TC go the distance
By Anne Stanton
On a 2,178-mile hike you think. Think, think, think.
For the first rainy and frigid month on the Appalachian Trail in Georgia, Tim Keenan thought incessantly about quitting. His trip kicked off on March 28, with an 8.8 mile walk just to get to the start of the real trail at Springer Mountain (and once there, he heard about a nearby parking lot). He thought about quitting the next morning at 5:30 when he dragged on his clothes, stiff, cold and damp from the day before.
 
Monday, November 16, 2009

Bart Stupak‘s risky strategy

Features Anne Stanton Will his anti-abortion amendment save health care reform, or wreck it?
U.S. Representative Bart Stupak is in the hot seat. Forty-one Democrats have signed a letter saying they won’t approve a final bill for affordable health care reform if it contains his abortion amendment.
Yet it was Rep. Stupak’s amendment that allowed the health reform bill to squeak through the house with a 215-210 vote on November 7. If the amendment is taken out of the final compromise bill, 64 Democrats say they won’t vote for it.
Could abortion be the issue that kills affordable health care reform?
 
Monday, November 16, 2009

We need hugs, not shrugs

Features Anne Stanton We Need Hugs, Not Shrugs
Hard times prompt us to re-examine our priorities
By Anne Stanton
Our country was pretty much founded on the competing doctrines of capitalism and Christianity, and it can feel stressful. Get rich and horde your money, the little devil on one shoulder says, while the little angel urges you to give your money to the poor, although not specifically mentioning Medicaid, public assistance, and Head Start.
 
Monday, November 9, 2009

The treasure hunter: Fred Hiebert

Art Anne Stanton The treasure hunter: Fred Hiebert
Anne Stanton 11/9/09
The Treasure Hunter
Fred Hiebert rediscovered 21,000 pieces of lost
gold in Afghanistan


By Anne Stanton

As an archaeologist, Fred Hiebert has been under house arrest in Turkmenistan and narrowly escaped a chemical fire in Moscow. On his last visit to Afghanistan, his hotel windows cracked and broke from a bomb going off nearby. But one of his scariest moments was right here in Michigan, working along the I-75 freeway near Saginaw.
He and Kate Moore, who later became his wife, were University of Michigan students hired to determine if there were any buried artifacts that might prevent a highway from getting built across farmland.
 
Monday, November 9, 2009

Region Watch: Med pot grower faces jail/ Want to tell a great story?

Region Watch Anne Stanton Region Watch:Med pot grower faces trial/Want to tell a great story?
By Anne Stanton 11/9/09

Archie Kiel, a “caregiver” who grows marijuana plants for himself and several other medical marijuana patients, was arraigned in 13th Circuit Court last week on felony charges for growing more than the legal limit of plants.
He pled not guilty. Kiel has a jury status conference on December 9—the final date on whether he can decide to plead or go to trial.
Charged with manufacture of more than 20 plants and less than 200, Kiel of Rapid City will likely stand trial in December, unless the judge agrees to dismiss his case, said his attorney Ross Hickman.
Hickman says he wishes the prosecutor would just drop the case. “At best, here’s a guy who was trying to abide by the law, and thought he was and made a mistake. It’s certainly possible he didn’t make a mistake. It just doesn’t seem appropriate to hang him out to dry for this,” Hickman said.
 
Monday, November 2, 2009

Fighting for your life

Features Anne Stanton Fighting for Your Life
One alternative to drug rehab: boxing

By Anne Stanton 11/2/09

Why would you teach a kid who gets in fights at school how to fight even better?

To Dakotah Tarrant, a freshman at Traverse City Central Senior High, it makes all the sense in the world.
 
Monday, November 2, 2009

Doubt: Anne Avery Miller

Features Anne Stanton DOUBT
Anne Avery Miller says she’s guilty of
a mental meltdown… but not murder

By Anne Stanton 11/2/09

The fate of Anne Avery Miller—an attractive barber from Elk Rapids who was suspected of killing her troubled 16-year-old son two years ago—depends on the outcome of an ongoing closed court proceeding.
The decision on whether to charge Miller, 39, will likely be made within a month, said Antrim County Prosecutor Charlie Koop.
It’s a decision long in coming. On November 7, 2007, Sam was found with a gunshot wound to his head. Police initially thought Sam committed suicide because he was devastated by the death of two friends and his boss. Shortly after his death, Miller turned in a suicide note that she found in one of Sam’s notebooks.
 
Monday, November 2, 2009

The high cost of toking, Part II

Features Anne Stanton Must Parents Pay for Kids’ Mistakes?
Yup, It’s the Law

By Anne Stanton 11/2/09

Got a teenager who’s had trouble with the law? Then be prepared to pay dearly for court-ordered fines and rehabilitation -- sometimes totaling tens of thousands of dollars.
Charging parents for their teen’s rehab and legal bills has the court of law behind it, said Frank Vandervort, clinical assistant professor of law at the University of Michigan.
“Even if the parent objects, and doesn’t think it’s appropriate, the court can override the parent’s prerogative. And the case law is very clear that the debt survives the kid well into adulthood,” he said.
 
Monday, October 26, 2009

The high cost of toking

Features Anne Stanton The High Cost of Toking
Anne Stanton 10/26/09

When the Express ran a cover story of Archie Kiel growing medical marijuana plants in Antrim County, people overwhelmingly responded with letters and phone calls with their own stories of marijuana and the law.
The following story is about the late Trevor Coddington and his odyssey through the Grand Traverse County probate system. It is by no means typical, but does show the consequences that attach not only to the child, but also to the family.
Part II is coming in November.

By Anne Stanton

Dan Coddington opened his door to his home in Traverse City’s central neighborhood, where he was babysitting his two-year-old granddaughter. She gleefully showed off her new coloring book.
Dan was not so happy.
Over on the counter were two cardboard boxes filled with papers that reflected the legal and financial challenges that began when his late son, Trevor, was caught smoking pot six years ago.
Trevor entered the Grand Traverse County probate court system for possession of marijuana at the age of 14. He was in and out of court-ordered drug rehabilitation for 15 months. His treatment and court fines added up to $53,054 and his divorced parents were billed the amount due, nearly $26,000 apiece. The total bill was later reduced by $8,593.
 
 
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