Letters

Letters 07-27-2015

Next For Brownfields In regard to your recent piece on brownfield redevelopment in TC, the Randolph Street project appears to be proceeding without receiving its requested $600k in brownfield funding from the county. In response to this, the mayor is quoted as saying that the developer bought the property prior to performing an environmental assessment and had little choice but to now build it...

Defending Our Freedom This is in response to Sally MacFarlane Neal’s recent letter, “War Machines for Family Entertainment.” Wake Up! Make no mistake about it, we are at war! Even though the idiot we have for a president won’t accept the fact because he believes we can negotiate with Iran, etc., ISIS and their like make it very clear they intend to destroy the free world as we know it. If you take notice of the way are constantly destroying their own people, is that living...

What Is Far Left? Columnist Steve Tuttle, who so many lambaste as a liberal, considers Sen. Sanders a far out liberal “nearly invisible from the middle.” Has the middle really shifted that far right? Sanders has opposed endless war and the Patriot Act. Does Mr. Tuttle believe most of our citizens praise our wars and the positive results we have achieved from them? Is supporting endless war or giving up our civil liberties middle of the road...

Parking Corrected Stephen Tuttle commented on parking in the July 13 Northern Express. As Director of the Traverse City Downtown Development Authority, I feel compelled to address a couple key issues. But first, I acknowledge that  there is some consternation about parking downtown. As more people come downtown served by less parking, the pressure on what parking we have increases. Downtown serves a county with a population of 90,000 and plays host to over three million visitors annually...

Home · Articles · By Sandra Serra Bradshaw

Sandra Serra Bradshaw

 
Top Articles from
No articles in this section
Thursday, December 9, 2004

Hattie‘s: New Owners, Same Standard of Dining Excellence

Features Sandra Serra Bradshaw Hattie’s is known in gourmet restaurant circles as one of the top 10 fine dining establishments in the state. The restaurant recently changed owners and they aim to keep both the record and perhaps even surpass it.
Sam and Michelle Hybels of Suttons Bay officially took over on October 12. “I left for Lansing to get our liquor license after the real estate closing and 40 minutes before opening our first night, I got back with it,” said Sam with a grin.
The restaurant does indeed continue to serve liquor as well as fine wines, including an emphasis on those of local vintners. But what Hattie’s is known for is consistent attentive service, attention to detail and wonderful food exquisitely prepared. Much of the restaurant’s success is due to chef Patty Hickman.
Owner Sam had read about Hattie’s national credentials 12 years ago in a culinary publication while he was still at the Pennsylvania Culinary Institute. Since then, he has worked as a chef in cities including Chicago, New York and LA. Locally, he has been a chef at LaBecasse, Key to the County and Sugar Loaf. In between chef stints he worked in the orchards “to pay the bills.” Often Hybels drove his tractor past Hattie’s with a tug at his heart to perhaps one day work there.
Eventually, he was hired on. “It was great to work in such an establishment with a strong culinary representative quality kitchen. It raises an eyebrow on a resumè,” he said. Now, as new owner, Hybels credits former Hattie’s partners/owners Jim Milliman and Rob Giffer. “They made this restaurant the success it is.”
Launched in the late-’80s, early ‘90s, Hattie’s was named after Jim’s grandmother, who inspired his own efforts as a chef.
 
Thursday, November 18, 2004

Tempting Treats at the Village Cafe in Cross Village

Features Sandra Serra Bradshaw The drive to Cross Village via the historic Tunnel of Trees along M-119 makes the trip up to this tiny town near the tip of the Michigan mitten all the more impressive.  And it’s worth the journey, for here you will find the Village Café, which offers a taste of Polish cuisine along with a unique niche in introducing European pastries to up north diners.
As I was driving to the café, an Oldies 107 radio disc jockey reported, “This is National Grouch Day.” Well, that afternoon the little restaurant was bustling with a steady drove of customers - and everyone who walked through the door was smiling and greeted as if family.  No grouches in sight.
 
Thursday, October 28, 2004

Sip a Coffee & Connect: WiFi Technology Energizes Petoskey Coffeeshop

Features Sandra Serra Bradshaw From Philadelphia to Los Angeles, Detroit to Harbor Springs and throughout the world, Internet coffee cafés are the new “buzz.” In fact, Internet cafes.com shows a database of 4,260 Internet cafes in 140 countries. It’s definitely a growing trend worldwide as well as right here in Northern Michigan.
For Pete Lambeth of Petoskey, it’s been a dream of his to open his own coffee shop for a long time. “I have wanted to start up my own coffee shop for many years,” he explained. “It just seemed like the timing was never right. And now so many people use the Internet. Well, I just knew that not only local people but people who travel like to have access to the Internet to keep in touch with their business and families.”
The owner of Pete’s Pipe & Tobacco Shop in downtown Petoskey, his dream was finally realized with a bit of an added New Millennium twist. Set two doors down from his first store – which he had started in 1996 – Coffee & Connect opened this past July and is being very well received.
 
Thursday, June 24, 2004

Men of Vision: Recapturing Erhardt Peters‘ Photo Odyssey

Features Sandra Serra Bradshaw Erhardt Peters was a prolific and talented photographer in the Ludington and Leelanau areas throughout much of the 20th century. During his career he generatedEE thousands of black and white photos of Northern Michigan, but Leland and Fishtown were his particular favorites.
 
Thursday, April 8, 2004

The Air We Breathe: Monitors Sniff out Pollution on the Great Lakes

Features Sandra Serra Bradshaw It used to be when driving “Up North“ from the big cities, one could expect bright blue skies and refreshingly clean air. But today, it is nearly impossible to escape air pollution anywhere on the earth. Traces of toxins are even found in Antarctica. Even though the Grand Traverse region has relatively few point-source pollution sites such as factories and coal burning plants, air transfer knows no boundaries. Pollution travels so to say, “with the will of the wind.“
 
Thursday, October 3, 2002

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. -- The Riverkeeper of the Hudson Spawns a Waterkeeper Alliance now Growing World-wide

Features Sandra Serra Bradshaw “In ten years Grand Traverse Bay will be completely different than today,” stated Robert F. Kennedy Jr., who serves as president of the Waterkeeper Alliance, chief prosecuting attorney for the Hudson Riverkeeper, co-director at the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic in New York and senior attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council.
 
Thursday, October 3, 2002

The Watershed Center Appoints a Full-time Baykeeper to Help Residents Protect Grand Traverse Bay

Features Sandra Serra Bradshaw Our region has been blessed with an abundance of water, which for many is what draws us here to live year ‘round. In particular, Grand Traverse Bay is thought to have the highest water quality of any of the larger bays on Lake Michigan. With the Great Lakes containing approximately 18 percent of the world‘s freshwater supply, protecting its purity is of utmost importance. Yet, the draw of its beauty brings with it an influx in population, opening a sort of Pandora‘s box. Increased developmental pressure means that more natural resources need protection. Yet, we now have hope in the name of a newly appointed Grand Traverse Baykeeper, John A. Nelson.
 
 
Close
Close
Close