Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

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Danielle Horvath

 
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Thursday, June 10, 2004

Cheap Dates: The Best of Times are Free & Easy in Northern Michigan

Features Danielle Horvath For around 20 bucks or less, you can…

…go back in time for that all-American summer date at the Cherry Bowl Drive In, just east of Honor. One of only a handful of drive in movie theatres left in the U.S., the Cherry Bowl is celebrating its 51st year and boasts all the nostalgia you’d expect, including the occasional Elvis sighting. Since it is a family-run place, movies are in the PG-13 range. Flicks are $7.50, with kids under 12 free. They change weekly, open April – September, show starts at dusk, call ahead for the latest line up, 231-325-3413.
 
Thursday, June 10, 2004

Rolling out the New Betsie Valley Trail: Region‘s Newest Bike Trail will Connect to Michigan Network

Features Danielle Horvath Someday, the Betsie Valley Trail will connect to the Michigan Trailway System which is proposed to stretch over 1,000 miles across the state, creating a web of recreational trails that stretch from Lake Huron to Lake Michigan and from the south state line across the U.P.
 
Thursday, February 20, 2003

A Circle of Comfort: Yurt Living Offers an Affordable Alternative Close to Nature

Features Danielle Horvath It‘s like stepping into a circle of warmth in the middle of winter. Large windows bring in bright light, even on a gray day. The steel support beam dIrects your eye up to the skylight dome in the middle, and then down the wood trim that completes the circle to the wood floor. Open, airy and inviting, the yurt home of Karen Coussens stands out in a field overlooking an 80-acre valley in Benzie County.
 
Thursday, September 5, 2002

Dog Wagner: Holistic Vet

Features Danielle Horvath Benzie veterinarian uses acupuncture, kineseology, energy sensing, and herbs on animal patients

For over 40 years, Dr. Bill “Doc“ Wagner has cared for animals, from large and small farms near Manistee in the early ‘60s, to his small animal practice that began in Beulah in 1968, to his Crystal Lake Veterinary Clinic in Benzonia where he’s been since ’75. What makes Doc different from other veterinarians is that he’s also been treating them using alternative health methods, sometimes with amazing results.
 
Thursday, July 18, 2002

The Power of Bread: At Pleasanton Bakery the Ancient Art of Bread-making Nourishes Body & Soul

Features Danielle Horvath “Real work is never a disagreeable chore. It contributes to life rather than taking from it; it gives us the chance to discover and hone our skills, to see how we fit into life, and to lose our sense of isolation by sharing a common goal with our fellow human beings.“ - Eknath Easwaran, The Compassionate Universe

At the end of a two-track road in rural Manistee County, an ancient tradition is being kept alive and lovingly nurtured into a small family-owned business. Gerard Grabowski and Jan Shireman began Pleasanton Bakery nine years ago in a small building behind their house. Their dream was to create a home-based business that reflected their beliefs in organic agriculture, whole food nutrition and sustainable living, while producing a product that would be useful and valuable to the community.
 
Thursday, April 18, 2002

The Real Land Down Under: Brian Lea‘s Antarctic Adventure

Features Danielle Horvath Brian Lea has an adventurous spirit. Whether running the Boston Marathon or scaling a mountain somewhere out west, he‘s one of those types that doesn‘t sit still too long. And since turning 50 last year, Brian has decided to embark on fulfilling some of his life-long quests. One of them happened last fall when he spent two months in Antarctica, as part of a job with the Raytheon Polar Services Company to work as an electrician on the construction of a new research station.
It took six planes and 24 hours to travel from Northern Michigan to New Zealand, where Lea underwent training in how to dress and prepare for the frigid climate. The last six hours of the trip was in a military-style cargo plane from the U.S. McMurdo Station on the edge of Antarctica to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.
“It was quite a shock when I got off that warm plane and into the air. It was minus 58 degrees, I never felt air that cold!“ Lea explained.
 
 
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