Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

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Danielle Horvath

 
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Thursday, June 10, 2004

Cheap Dates: The Best of Times are Free & Easy in Northern Michigan

Features Danielle Horvath For around 20 bucks or less, you can…

…go back in time for that all-American summer date at the Cherry Bowl Drive In, just east of Honor. One of only a handful of drive in movie theatres left in the U.S., the Cherry Bowl is celebrating its 51st year and boasts all the nostalgia you’d expect, including the occasional Elvis sighting. Since it is a family-run place, movies are in the PG-13 range. Flicks are $7.50, with kids under 12 free. They change weekly, open April – September, show starts at dusk, call ahead for the latest line up, 231-325-3413.
 
Thursday, June 10, 2004

Rolling out the New Betsie Valley Trail: Region‘s Newest Bike Trail will Connect to Michigan Network

Features Danielle Horvath Someday, the Betsie Valley Trail will connect to the Michigan Trailway System which is proposed to stretch over 1,000 miles across the state, creating a web of recreational trails that stretch from Lake Huron to Lake Michigan and from the south state line across the U.P.
 
Thursday, February 20, 2003

A Circle of Comfort: Yurt Living Offers an Affordable Alternative Close to Nature

Features Danielle Horvath It‘s like stepping into a circle of warmth in the middle of winter. Large windows bring in bright light, even on a gray day. The steel support beam dIrects your eye up to the skylight dome in the middle, and then down the wood trim that completes the circle to the wood floor. Open, airy and inviting, the yurt home of Karen Coussens stands out in a field overlooking an 80-acre valley in Benzie County.
 
Thursday, September 5, 2002

Dog Wagner: Holistic Vet

Features Danielle Horvath Benzie veterinarian uses acupuncture, kineseology, energy sensing, and herbs on animal patients

For over 40 years, Dr. Bill “Doc“ Wagner has cared for animals, from large and small farms near Manistee in the early ‘60s, to his small animal practice that began in Beulah in 1968, to his Crystal Lake Veterinary Clinic in Benzonia where he’s been since ’75. What makes Doc different from other veterinarians is that he’s also been treating them using alternative health methods, sometimes with amazing results.
 
Thursday, July 18, 2002

The Power of Bread: At Pleasanton Bakery the Ancient Art of Bread-making Nourishes Body & Soul

Features Danielle Horvath “Real work is never a disagreeable chore. It contributes to life rather than taking from it; it gives us the chance to discover and hone our skills, to see how we fit into life, and to lose our sense of isolation by sharing a common goal with our fellow human beings.“ - Eknath Easwaran, The Compassionate Universe

At the end of a two-track road in rural Manistee County, an ancient tradition is being kept alive and lovingly nurtured into a small family-owned business. Gerard Grabowski and Jan Shireman began Pleasanton Bakery nine years ago in a small building behind their house. Their dream was to create a home-based business that reflected their beliefs in organic agriculture, whole food nutrition and sustainable living, while producing a product that would be useful and valuable to the community.
 
Thursday, April 18, 2002

The Real Land Down Under: Brian Lea‘s Antarctic Adventure

Features Danielle Horvath Brian Lea has an adventurous spirit. Whether running the Boston Marathon or scaling a mountain somewhere out west, he‘s one of those types that doesn‘t sit still too long. And since turning 50 last year, Brian has decided to embark on fulfilling some of his life-long quests. One of them happened last fall when he spent two months in Antarctica, as part of a job with the Raytheon Polar Services Company to work as an electrician on the construction of a new research station.
It took six planes and 24 hours to travel from Northern Michigan to New Zealand, where Lea underwent training in how to dress and prepare for the frigid climate. The last six hours of the trip was in a military-style cargo plane from the U.S. McMurdo Station on the edge of Antarctica to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.
“It was quite a shock when I got off that warm plane and into the air. It was minus 58 degrees, I never felt air that cold!“ Lea explained.
 
 
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