Letters

Letters 09-22-2014

Lame Duck Move

Twenty three states are controlled by Republican state legislatures and governors including Michigan. It is reported that Michigan Republicans are planning a sneak attack during the lame duck session to change the way electoral votes are allocated in presidential elections...

Lessons From The Middle East

“My enemy’s enemy is my friend.” That statement applies in the Middle East....

Student Athletes, Coaches Worth It

Are coaches at major universities overpaid? A simple Google search will show quite the opposite. These coaches do not get paid with taxpayer money. The coaches get paid by media companies, equipment companies, alumni groups, as well as revenue from ticket sales and merchandise...

Mute The Political Ads

Mark Sunday, September 14th as the opening of the flood gates, with TV political attack advertising. Fasten your seat belts until November 4th...

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Monday, December 28, 2009

National Writers Series

Features National Writers Series offers 2010 lineup
When author Doug Stanton was growing up in Traverse City, he wondered
if it would be possible to bring nationally-known writers to his
hometown to talk about what they knew. This year, he’ll make that
dream happen, bringing some of the brightest celebrities of the
literary world to downtown Traverse City.
 
Monday, December 21, 2009

Top 20 Michigan notable books

Books Top 20: Michigan Notable Books
Each year, the Library of Michigan compiles its list of 20 Notable Books highlighting Michigan people, places, and events.
Short stories of people living on the rough side of life in Detroit; a biography of the state’s first geologist; and a children’s book that tells the story of a slave family’s flight to freedom are among this year’s most notable Michigan books.
“This year’s Michigan Notable Books bring to life the Michigan experience through vivid storytelling that creates portraits of the people and places that make Michigan great,” said State Librarian Nancy Robertson. “These books celebrate Michigan as a place and a people that even in the most trying of times find transformation.”
Michigan Notable Books is a statewide program that began as part of the 1991 Michigan Week celebration, geared to pay tribute and draw attention to the people, places and things that make Michigan life unique.
The 2009 Michigan Notable Books are:
 
Monday, December 21, 2009

Letters

Letters No lack of concerts
In response to Rick Coates’ article “Where Are All the Concerts?” (12/14).
Here is a list of music performances from international touring
musicians and bands that have performed at InsideOut Gallery in just
the last two of the four years we have been presenting concerts. Many
of these artists have returned two and three times. A very large
number of these acts were booked and performed during the winter
months. Sorry Mr. Coates missed them.
Many of these shows were co-produced by Seamus Shinners of Connemara
Concerts, who has been sponsoring great music in this region for
decades. Seamus produces many great music performances at many
different venues every month. If anyone should be included in a round
table discussion about the concert promoters and venue managers in
this area, it’s him.
You want to truly find out how the live music biz works? Look no
further than Traverse City’s very own Rick Shimmel. You could do a
whole separate magazine on what Rick has accomplished in the live
concert promotion world.
Coates and the Northern Express need to get off the Applebees Music
Circuit and start paying greater attention to the “truly innovative”
music that is being presented in Northern Michigan on a regular basis.
Sorry if it sounds like sour grapes on my part, but good God -- lame
classic rock and the casinos? See you at the next Chubby Checker show!
(Included was a list of more than 60 performers.)

Michael Curths • InsideOut, TC

 
Monday, December 14, 2009

Letters

Letters Riveting Read...
Anne Stanton’s articles on U.S. Rep. Bart Stupak should be reprinted
in the Washington Post and New York Times. Her Stupak interview about
the world of the C Street “Family” (12/7) is riveting.
As a Grand Traverse Democrat, I supported Mr. Stupak for years, but no
more. The Stupak Amendment to the health care bill is a pointed,
political attack on women’s health insurance rights and reproductive
rights. His association with the “Family” (a secret religious group in
Washington DC) – is very surprising news.

Grant W. Parsons • TC
 
Monday, December 7, 2009

Letters

Letters Rooster Ruckus
I would like to thank Noah Fowle and the Express for the article on
our pet bird, Beaker. A clarification on a couple things, however
-- Jim Tamlyn stated Beaker is outside crowing and the neighbors are
complaining, not noting it is only a small number of neighbors
complaining.
According to Emmet County’s own investigators, who have been on
site several times -- they never heard the rooster. Beaker lives
indoors, has his own kennel (cleaned daily) in our basement. In
limited increments, Beaker does go outside after 12 noon, and is
brought inside if he crows excessively, just as one would do with a
barking dog (like the ones owned by our complaining neighbors).
The same zoning ordinance also prohibits planting flowers,
vegetables or trees on less than two acres. Yet, while Emmet County
chooses not to enforce this obviously ridiculous part of the
ordinance, it is heavy-handedly executing orders in another part of
the same ordinance.
This is a case of discrimination and unfair application of the law.
We have tried to place Beaker on three separate farms and each time
were requested to come and get him as the people feared he would not
survive because he was so stressed. He is deathly afraid of other
chickens. He has bonded to his human and animal family and would
likely suffer from separation.
If Beaker were a special needs child, I am fairly certain our
neighbors would not object. But, he is a ‘special needs’ animal and
our neighbors simply cannot wrap their limited imaginations around the
concept that a bird is a bird.
Keeping Beaker is no different from keeping a parrot or a cockatoo
for a pet, yet these are allowed and he is NOT. Where is the so-called
‘compassion‘ in that reasoning?

Andy & Sharon Peters • Petoskey
 
Monday, November 30, 2009

Letters

Letters Escape from Afghanistan
The best way to get rid of a good idea is to give it to a committee that never meets.
Some people are growing impatient with President Obama for not making a decision about sending more troops to Afghanistan. What he’s doing is waiting for the whole idea of having troops there to die on the vine, and for good reason.
There is no definition of victory in Afghanistan. We are not going to convert Afghans to Christianity or turn them into Republicans and Democrats. An authority on what it would take for Karzai to equip and maintain a militia to hold onto power in the country estimates it would cost four billion a year, while the entire gross national product of the country is only one billion. It is not going to happen.
The Taliban are not the enemy of the
United States, though we are converting them fast to hate us. Our enemy is al Qaeda, an invisible, international group of fanatic terrorists with no borders and no uniforms. The Soviets had 300,000 troops in Afghanistan and lost. The country has been the death of empires that tried to subdue those fighting folks. You don’t go to bed with rattlesnakes.
So what’s the exist strategy? Simple: convene a conference of all countries that have their troops there and admit that the Taliban versus Karzai’s government is an internal conflict and none of our business. The U.S. cannot simply back out unilaterally without looking like a bunch of quitters and wimps, but if the consensus of the countries contributing troops is that there is no definition of victory, shutting down the effort is smart.
Sure, it will leave Karzai twisting in the wind, which he surely will at the end of a rope when the Taliban retake control of their country but remember: it is their country. We are interlopers, invaders, even crusaders if you will. We can offer Mr. Karzai asylum to save his hide, but that’s just a small factor in the end game.
With half of our own children dependent on food stamps and millions unemployed we have no business pumping money into a corrupt government where everyone steals and we stand to gain nothing but enemies whose culture believes in revenge, not reconciliation.
Keep on waiting, President Obama. Let the committee decide.

Harley Sachs • Houghton, MI
 
Monday, November 23, 2009

Letters

Letters Stupak & women
In response to the article on the Stupak amendment by Anne Stanton in the November 16 Northern Express Weekly:
Congressman Stupak, you claim in the article that National Public Radio says some groups that oppose your amendment are misrepresenting the facts. I, too, listened to the NPR analysis of your abortion ban amendment, and clearly we heard two different things.
Whereas you heard, “Keeps the law the same,” I heard, “Makes permanent a law that currently has to be renewed every year,” and, “Abortion rights could be curtailed if this bill becomes law.”
I think we both heard, “Women still have the option to buy an extra rider to cover abortion services.” Although being a woman, I think my interpretation was a little different than yours. Mr. Stupak.
I have likely never been as insulted by anyone as you at that moment in my life. I actually yelled at the nice NPR anchor. “Women do not plan unplanned pregnancies! We plan the births of our children. We plan on providing for them. We plan every last penny in our lives in order to do so! What a ridiculous notion that we will be without coverage because we didn’t plan to have an abortion.”
Hide behind the “we’ve got to get this thing passed” rhetoric all you want. But what I just heard was, “Women be damned.”
If we are poor, federal employees, members of the military, receiving Indian Health Insurance, on Medicaid, on disability, hoping for a public option, likely to receive federal subsidies on a public option – if we are in fact the women who already pay more for our medical costs than men because we pay for years of reproductive health coverage like birth control – then what I just heard was, “You are my Political Pawn.”
I would encourage men and women alike to contact their representatives and ask them to oppose this amendment.
Maybe then what I will hear from you, Congressman Stupak, is an apology.

Jennifer Kirkpatrick Johnson
• Kingsley
 
Monday, November 16, 2009

Letters

Letters No guns on campus
I live in Leelanau county, the same beautiful county where State Senator Michelle McManus resides. It is very important that I voice my opposition to having her legislation introduced to allow concealed weapons on college campuses.
I spent 25 years working with students on a college campus. Our security did not even carry guns. A college campus consists of a community of students between the ages of (approximately) 17-23 years of age. These students reside in a wonderful environment, for a few years in their lives.
I am so appalled at the concept of carrying concealed weapons on campus that I find myself searching for words to express my dismay on this issue.
Students do not want to sit in classes, go to events, or walk to parking lots knowing that the person near them is carrying a concealed weapon. Faculty and staff do not want students to have weapons. When weapons, of any dangerous kind, are found on students or in residence halls, they are confiscated, to protect themselves and the other members on campus. I sincerely hope that
Sen. McManus examines the concept of students being allowed to carry concealed weapons. I shudder at the thought.

Dorothy Mudget • Leelanau County

Heartbroken
On October 26 the Express ran an article called the “High Price of Toking.” Imagine my heartbreak as I read the article about my son, Trevor Coddington. I was not consulted about this ‘story’ and had I been, I would have reminded the writer and participants that this child is no longer with us, and disgracing his memory for monetary gain, as is mentioned in the story, is unconscionable.
Whether the court system was 100 percent correct in its treatment of my son or not, the decisions were made, years ago. As a responsible parent, I will pay for what is required by the court.
Trevor was a good and loving son. Unfortunately he will not get a chance to prove that, or what a great adult he would have been.
Might I suggest a good story called “The High Price of Grief?” Perhaps the word compassion will come up in that particular story.
Sandy Zoulek • via email

(The Express attempted to contact Sandy Zoulek for the story, but was unable to obtain her address or phone number. - ed.)
 
Monday, November 9, 2009

Letters

Letters Letters 11/09/09
Parents & responsibility
Is this article about the high costs parents pay for their children’s crimes or is it a sob story about a teen drug addict? (Re: “The High Price of Toking,” 10/26.) The fact is that teens with parents that take responsibility for their children’s actions make
better parents.
This article shows that the father, Dan, was trying to get out of paying his son’s fines rather than simply having his son, Trevor, assume some of the responsibility. The saddest part of this story is that Dan did not seem to be able to control Trevor. Even after months in rehab Trevor continued to ‘hang with the wrong crowd’ and use drugs and alcohol. Why did Dan allow this? Considering the lack of parental control in young Trevor’s life, I agree that the parents should be responsible for the fines and costs.
I feel sorry for Trevor’s mother; she seems to have had no say in what discipline Trevor received and yet she paid the fines and costs without complaint.
I am the non-custodial parent of a teenage boy (he lives with his grandmother due to the poor choices I made in the past). I have already had to pay some court costs for the choices he has made. Yet, whenever I try to suggest a different way to discipline, or voice an opinion as to the unacceptable behavior of his friends, I am reminded that I do not have custody and therefore (in their opinion) I have no say in his upbringing.
I understand how Trevor’s mother must feel, and I am sorry for her loss.

Elizabeth Fox • via email


Advice for journalists
In his column Robert Downes reflected about which stories to pursue in the Nov.
3-10 Northern Express. In that issue you carried a long story by Anne Stanton about a woman who could be brought up on a murder charge. You went through her history in painstaking detail in a manner reminiscent of Jerry Springer.
I would argue that such a story should not be featured in your newspaper. Why? Because it does not relate to larger issues that affect the public. By contrast, your piece on Dan Coddington (“The High Price of Toking”) and the justice of courts inflicting large monetary obligations upon youth and parents is totally appropriate because it lays bare state laws and law enforcement practices that could be changed.
While the difficulty in getting all the facts frequently provides a barrier to writing a story (as Downes indicates), some stories are not worth investigating simply because they have no significance outside the people directly involved. Reject the stories for which evidence cannot be found. Reject the stories that have no significance. Following those rules you should be able to do a terrific job on the rest!

Richard Fidler • TC
 
Monday, November 2, 2009

Letters

Letters Letters 11/2/09
Laughing stock legislators
If anyone needs more evidence as to why Lansing does not take our Northern Michigan legislators seriously, one need look no further than the story regarding our representatives pushing for handguns being allowed on college campuses.
Michelle McManus and Wayne Schmidt have become the laughing stock of legislators, along with Alan Cropsey (R-Dewitt), who is pushing hard for guns to be allowed in Michigan high schools.
The voters of Grand Traverse keep sending these right-wingers to Lansing even though they are obviously out of touch with the majority and are very ineffective when it comes to representing our real interests. From school financing to return on tax investment to amount spent on roads, Northern Michigan has been getting the short end of it for years. We are not taken seriously in Lansing!
Allowing kids to have guns on a college campus, or arming public school teachers with weapons designed only to kill fellow human beings is antithetical to the education purpose and process. (Duh!) It also is against the majority’s wishes and flies in the face of common sense and human dignity.
No wonder Lansing laughs at us - look no further than McManus and Schmidt.

Gary S. Powell • TC

Sound the alarm
“Choice and competition.” That’s the new catch phrase to sell healthcare reform in Washington. I recall Obama himself saying you can keep your own plan, keep your own doctor. Do you remember? The “facts’ say otherwise.
Congressman Paul Ryan who sits on the committee writing the bills, says under “all four bills” being considered, plans like my own high deductible/HSA will be “illegal.” So much for the rhetoric!
If you oppose Obama’s plans, protest in Washington, listen to talk radio, or watch Fox News, you‘re labeled an “angry white male.” To the contrary, those who oppose the plan are a diversified group from all ethnicities. I myself am simply worried about the country’s survival.
In closing, like Social Security those writing the plan are exempting themselves and many of their supporters from its repercussions. That fact, and the fact that they’re rushing its passage without us seeing it first, is further reason to sound the alarm and enough alone for its rejection.

Brian Spencer • TC
What‘s in your heart
I had to agree: an old timer and I were discussing family matters when the bombing of the Middle East and Baghdad came up. He said: “What can we expect when our own families can’t get along?”
How true. It really starts in the heart. It‘s time to take the log out of our own personal eye before we can help our brother or sister. It all starts with self; then onward towards family, town, state, country, world.

Steve Rozanski • TC

Cheers for Dan Scripps
In the term limit-caused wreckage of the State Legislature, one bright spot can be found – Representative Dan Scripps. Since taking office, Scripps has worked to protect the Great Lakes and improve school funding equity. His efforts may deserve some of the credit for Governor Granholm’s recent decision to reduce the school funding gap. During the ongoing budget crisis, Scripps fought successfully, on behalf of his fellow sportsmen, to save wetland protections. Additionally, he and like-minded legislators were able to reduce the size of cuts to education.
Scripps keeps in touch with his constituents. During the height of the budget crisis, he sent nearly daily updates to those on his email list. And he makes himself available each month to gather input from citizens in all four counties he serves.
So while Senate Majority Leader Bishop plays his silly and dangerous games, House Speaker Dillon demonstrates that he has no idea what it means to be a leader, and Senator McManus shows more interest in toeing the insane party line than meeting the needs of her constituents, we can count on Dan Scripps to do what’s best for the people of Michigan. We need more politicians just like him.

Fred A. Cepela • TC

 
Monday, October 26, 2009

Letters

Letters Letters 10/26/09
The rest of the story...
The September 28, 2009 edition of the Northern Express contained a story about my overdraft nightmare (about a three-cent overdraft that resulted in hundreds of dollars in late fees from Chase bank).
My nightmare was a story about manipulation. Chase was using the classic carrots and stick form of manipulation to separate me from my money. The published story ended with Chase threatening to add still more fees to my account before closing it and permanently wrecking my credit record. Those threats were the sticks. The carrots came when they called to say that, if I paid just a little more money in the form of a greatly reduced fee, the whole matter would just go away. Instead, I emailed my “Nightmare” story to Senators Stabenow, Levin and Dodd (Chairman of the Senate Banking Committee).
Levin’s office was the only senator to reply. One of his aides called to suggest that I lodge a complaint with the Comptroller of the Currency. The website is: www.helpwithmybank.gov. I pasted my story onto that site’s complaint form. They emailed me a recognition number and said that I would hear from them within 30 days.
Subsequently, I received a short letter from Chase. It stated that my account had been credited for the most recent series of fees, relating to the three-cent overdraft, and had been closed with a zero balance! I immediately went on-line and verified. My checking account had disappeared. It was like it never existed. That was the good news. The bad news: Chase kept the $350 they took in the first two rounds of my overdraft nightmare. At this point, It appears that $350 was my parting gift to JP Morgan Chase; the not-so-small price I was forced to pay for my “Nightmare“ end.
I would like to thank the Northern Express for publishing my overdraft nightmare. The support from Northern Express readers was really appreciated. I was surprised at the number of people who have contacted me with similar banking problems.

Dominic R. Sondy • TC

More discrimination
I am writing to comment on “Letters 10/5 “A Lack of Respect” and Norm Jones‘ “Un Cool Insults“ on 10/19.”
I am a relatively new convert to Islam who has lived in the TC area for over 30 years. As a Muslim woman, wearing a hijab (head scarf) and modest, flowy clothing in and around our area, I have found 99 percent of the people here to be tolerant and very respectful. But, as some other ‘minorities’ can concur, it’s the one percent that make it difficult at times when you are just trying to mind your own business and go about living your life.
I work in a professional capacity and believe that I contribute in a positive way to my clients and the community and receive respect and support from co-workers in the workplace.
However, there have been incidents here in our lovely area that have caused me concern and disbelief -- having some “what has just happened here“ moments. Other incidents have caused me to feel downright fearful when I was threatened and physically assaulted due to my attire--and erroneous assumptions by my assailant.
Since becoming Muslim, I have had the following experiences: teen boys yelling slurs out of their car window in the parking lot at Tom‘s, a Christian woman (she was wearing a cross, so I assume she was a Christian) approached me in a local TC store -- demanding that I tell her where I’m “REALLY” from “originally.” She didn‘t take my word for it that I’m a 30-plus year resident. After repeatedly telling her that I am from TC she adamantly refused to believe me. She then grabbed me by the arm and shook me, saying, “You better watch out and not become one of those terrorists!”
On another occasion I was told that maybe I should move to Dearborn -- perhaps a joke maybe? But hey, by now, I’m beginning to wonder.
The lastest, since it was a housing discrimination incident, was the most disturbing. Recently during my search for an apartment in the area, I was told by a real estate agent who was renting an apartment for an out-of-state homeowner, that the rent now suddenly increased after he took one look at me when we met to see/show the apartment -- far different than the amount, which was $150 less, quoted over the phone. His cool and standoffish behaviour -- much different than his friendly tone on the phone, coupled with his discouraging remarks about the “flaws and drawbacks“ of the apartment let me know that I was not welcome there.

Maryam Hajar • TC

Music input
I’ve just finished reading Christopher Carlson’s October 19 letter, which you entitled “Doesn’t Like Column.” While I agree with Christopher that the Express’ Modern Rock can seem a little uninspired, and occasionally contains inaccurate information and dated reviews, I can see why your response was a little snarky... Tit for tat, as they say.
I laud the Northern Express Weekly for its coverage of local artists and those independant musicians who visit our area. It’s clear that you are truly dedicated to promoting the local art and music scene. However, while I mean no disrespect to Kristi Kates and her efforts, I have found Modern Rock disappointing of late. I agree with Christopher Carlson that you have an opportunity, yet often fail to introduce your readers to some of the amazing, innovative (and really catchy!) music produced by the scores of independant labels today: labels such as Secretly Canadian, Arts and Crafts, Thrill Jockey, Young Gods, XL Records, and Jagjaguwar... While I enjoy many of the groups Ms. Kates covers, I want to know what the young people like! Teens and 20somethings, after all, were the driving force that brought us swing, jazz, and rock & roll.
A consultation with the knowledgeable, music-loving owners of Sound It Out Records of downtown Traverse City might be a great place for a new music field trip. A little inspiration from others is always helpful in the creative process.

Mary Bowden • via email


Express Team Honored
The editorial, design and advertising team at Northern Express Weekly earned a number of awards in the 2009 Better Newspaper Contest sponsored by the Michigan Press Association.
• Anne Stanton took second place for “Unholy Childhood,“ her series on abuse in Harbor Springs; and also a second place for her “Computer Cop” series.
• Peg Muzzall took second place for her “Snowboard Girl“ cover photo.
• Robert Downes had an honorable mention for “Random Thoughts.”
• Colleen Zanotti, art director won first place for Best Color Ad (Bearcub Outfitters) and Best Promo Ad (Stimulus Package).
• Kyra Cross, graphic designer won second place for Best Color Ad (Hibbard‘s)
• The designers also won second place for Best Special Section.


 
Monday, October 19, 2009

Letters

Letters Letters 10/19/09


Canada‘s public option
As a Canadian expat, I would like to assure my fellow northern Michiganders that the Canadian health care system is alive and well. Contrary to recent letters published in local papers, Canadians overwhelmingly support their universal system. A new poll conducted by the Toronto-based Nanos Research shows 86.2 percent of Canadians are for “strengthening public health care rather than expanding for-profit services.”
My family and I have had nothing but good experiences with our care north of the border. From my father’s aggressive treatment for melanoma, to my grandmother’s multiple joint replacements and my baby brother’s lengthy hospitalization for a bout with pneumonia, the care in our rural Manitoba town was professional, efficient, timely and always without co-pays, deductibles and monthly premiums.
Personally, I do not know of a single
Canadian who wishes their system to be more like ours here. With unaffordable and constantly rising premiums, caps on treatment amounts, denials of coverage to increase corporate profits and exclusion of those with preexisting conditions, can you blame them? No one should be forced into financial ruin because they could not afford health insurance. Please join me in supporting health care reform and the public option.

Ty Schmidt
TC, formerly of Dauphin, Manitoba


Crazy state spending
While the state is cutting school funding due to a lack of money, some department heads are spending money on what can only be termed “discretionary” spending. This past fiscal year, $11 million was spent with Mohawk Industries, Georgia, for carpet tile. This is enough tiles to carpet the road from Suttons Bay to Cadillac. $6.8 million was spent for ergonomic and general seating. This is enough chairs for about 10,000 state employees. This is about one-third of the state workforce that works seated. Sadly, it does not include the 100 State Police who were laid off; patrol car seating was not included.
Then, $18 million was spent with Public Consulting Group, Maine; the purpose was not stated, but with the name of the company it sounds like “help us with propaganda.“ And $28 million went to Integris of Maine for an “Executive Information System.” This begs the question of how many executives are there and what info is so valuable it
requires spending $28 million when times are tough?
These two Maine purchases total $46 million. The state slogan, “Buy Michigan First” apparently does not apply to our government. The governor has line item veto power; maybe she should start reading the line items to see where the dollars are going.

Keith Ashley • Lake Leelanau

Doesn‘t like column
I don’t mean to be a giant a-hole, but it would be really great, if you’re going to bother writing about “modern” rock, to have someone who actually seems to care about and know something about music write the column. Case in point: last issue’s column:
“Guitarist Tom Morello (Rage Against the Machine) is collaborating with rapper/MC Boots Riley to form the Street Sweeper Social Club, which features what Morello calls “crushing guitar work” and which should also appeal to Rage fans.” -- I’ve owned this CD since June. Not exactly news, this. Plus, Boots Riley is the MC for The Coup, who are responsible for what may be the most politically volatile, daring, and important hip-hop ever put on disk. Does that not deserve a mention? Beyond “should appeal to Rage fans”? Jesus.
Later on: “French studio-popsters Phoenix are offering up their fifth studio set, Love 2, but you’ll have to wait a little longer for the suave duo’s latest tunes - Love 2 will be released on October 6...” -- FAIL. It’s not Phoenix. It’s Air. The only thing they have in common, really, is that they’re French.
I know that someone who actually wants to write reviews of albums that haven’t been on the shelves for months can, with relative ease, make connections with indie labels and get promo copies of music that’s not out yet, and that won’t also be reviewed in People and Newsweek.
I know the Northern Express isn’t exactly known for being cutting edge, but seriously, I love music; you have the opportunity to introduce people to great bands that they won’t find at freaking Walmart, and you don’t. So why bother? You could totally use that space to advertise another yuppie-ass winery or talk about how much someone paid for their clothes.

Christopher Carlson • via email
 
Monday, October 12, 2009

Challenged artists find A New Dimension

Art Challenged artists find A New Dimension
10/12/09
Artists coping with physical, emotional and cognitive challenges will have their moment of glory this Sunday with a chance to participate in an art exhibit entitled “A New Dimension” at the BATA Transfer Station in downtown Traverse City.
“The exhibit is an opportunity to unify artists who live day-to-day with challenges, along with a chance for the public to meet them and celebrate their abilities and talents,” said organizer Michelle St. Amant.
The event will feature an artists’ reception from 12:30-3:30 p.m. with a performance by jazz guitarist Ron Getz. A donation of $5 will be accepted at the door.
 
Monday, October 12, 2009

Letters

Letters Letters 10/12/09
Devastating closure
It’s Monday, my usual day for the gym. But I’m not going, nor are any of the Monday regulars at the Fitness Center. Why? Because with barely a week’s notice the
Fitness Center closed after 23 years of serving a diverse community at its convenient location.
While I am sad, others will be devastated, because it will be difficult, if not impossible, for them to go somewhere else. The Fitness Center served a few clients who were mentally and physically challenged, who walked or arrived by BATA bus, as well as young and old, fit and not so fit.
I take away two lessons: Out of town ownership is a BAD IDEA. Might things have been different if the owner had experienced the camaraderie, had seen the excellent guidance given by the trainers, had noticed the sense of loyalty and community among members?
That sense of community is my second lesson. I feel great affection for members whose figures now come to mind, people whose names I don’t know, to whom never spoke. We were all there together, doing our respective work to care for our bodies day after day. I will miss them all, as I will miss our competent, hard working trainers. Thank you all.
The Fitness Center was one of Traverse City’s well-kept secrets, a kind of gem in the rough. Opportunity awaits an entrepreneur would like to open an in town gym. He or she would find a supportive group of customers, ready to help market and make it work. I already have a name: Community Fitness, The Gym for the Rest of Us.

Alison Heins • TC

Protect the cougars
I understand that there is evidence that leads many scientists, veterinarians, and animal observers to believe that there is a breeding population of cougars in the state of Michigan.
I am asking that the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) take immediate action to start collecting evidence and try to determine how many cougars are in Michigan and what needs to be done to protect them.
Under the Michigan Endangered Species Act, the DNR is to “perform those acts necessary for the conservation, protection, restoration and propagation of endangered and threatened specifies of fish, wildlife and plants.”
By refusing to recognize the evidence presented by citizens of Michigan that cougars do exist in the state, the DNR fails to fulfill its obligation to protect cougars under the Endangered Species Act.

Pamela Thornton-Folkema
South Boardman
Mikko‘s bad decisions
Bravo! to Marty Beaudoin for his letter regarding Dennis Mikko (9/28).
Mr. Beaudoin could not have said it any better! My family’s lives also were affected negatively by Dennis Mikko’s decisions. He disregarded the facts, ignored the wishes of the children, and like Mr. Beaudoin stated, handled his courtroom in a dismissive, judgmental, opinionated and arrogant manner.
The Friend of the Court system has serious issues and should be monitored more carefully. Changes need to be made, everyone knows it, but nothing is being done.

Charleen Jach • TC

Corrections
Whoops -- Real Astrology was inadvertently omitted last week. Apologies.
Also, the band Umphreys McGee was in town promoting its new 2009 release, not their 2007 disc as stated in a story. And an ad for the band included a photo of the Disco Biscuits.


 
Monday, October 5, 2009

Three can‘t miss shows

Music 3 Can’t-Miss Shows
1-/5/09
Umphrey’s McGee brings on jam band sounds
A band has just got to be great to justify a weird name like Umphrey’s McGee, and word has it that the jam band from South Bend, Indiana delivers the goods.
According to their bio: “The band shuttles between styles with precision, from straight-up pop and rock to jazz, prog-metal, and classical. If you can name it, chances are Umphrey’s can play it.”
Drawn from students at the University of Notre Dame, the six-member band got its start playing college audiences in the late-’90s and were soon hailed as heirs to the Phish legacy. Through the years, they’ve been the toast of Rolling Stone magazine (as featured in the “Hot” issue), Blender, Billboard and other publications. The Washington Post named the band “rock’s undisputed lord of sonic shape-shifting.”
The band has appeared at both the Lollapalooza and Bonnaroo festivals. Currently, they’re promoting their 2007 album, Safety in Numbers - a double album that includes an acoustic and electric disc.
The band performs this Wednesday, Oct. 7 at the City Opera House in Traverse City, with the Macpodz opening the show at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25 advance, $30 on the day of the show. Info: www.porterhouseproductions.com
 
 
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