Letters

Letters 04-20-2015

Time For Hartman/Hammond  Long term planning would have coincided the timing of downing the Cass St/Keystone Bridge in TC and the construction of a Hartman/ Hammond Bridge. Such a planned roadway would have met everyone’s needs.

No more Apologies In view of the senseless, brutal murder of an unarmed black man in South Carolina last week by a police officer following a traffic stop for a broken taillight, we must revisit Thomas Kachadurian’s recent column.

What Is Your Experience To Lead? I listened to Marco Rubio’s announcement of his running for the presidency. Many have admired his speech. He said a lot of the right things

Outsourcing NMC Faculty  “Outsourcing” the vast majority of NMC faculty? Do I hear the sound of NMC’s reputation sucked down the drain to save money? Really?

Home · Articles · By Kevin L. Cronk

Kevin L. Cronk

 
Top Articles from
No articles in this section
Thursday, November 18, 2004

Bay Harbor‘s Pollution: Company should Clean up Its Mess

Other Opinions Kevin L. Cronk Little Traverse Bay is the focal point of our regional economy and quality of life. During recent years, the Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council has developed a watershed management plan to protect and improve water quality of the Bay and its tributaries.
Even as the plan was being finalized, an unknown, yet extremely serious water pollution problem was occurring. In what has turned out to be the greatest source of contamination to the Bay in recent history, CMS Energy, Inc. shut down a system that collected contaminated seepage from cement kiln dust (CKD) in Bay Harbor, essentially allowing the polluted water to flow freely into Little Traverse Bay.
Although CMS blames the system shutdown on technical difficulties, a conscious decision was made by somebody to halt operations instead of correcting the problem.
Leachate (contaminated seepage) from the kiln dust pile underneath the Bay Harbor Golf Course, with mercury levels 230 times greater than allowable limits and with a pH value showing the water to be more alkaline than household bleach, was allowed to flow into the Bay for eight months until the problem was uncovered by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.
 
 
Close
Close
Close