Letters

Letters 01-26-2015

Food Isn’t What It Was In regards to your article on nutrition being a key weapon for battling cancer, the problem is that much of our food has little nutritional value.

The Real Muslim Issues At least [Express columnist] Tom Kachadurian is being honest when he confesses a long-held family resentment towards Muslims

Applauding Opinions Kudos to the Northern Express for inviting guest editors to write columns. I have enjoyed the timely columns of Scott Hardy particularly

Party For The People One political party opposes minimum wage increases, pushes “right to work” legislation state-to-state, and finds it their mission to eliminate labor unions and the benefits they bring to everyday workers

Big Money Politics Wins Again I’m in agreement with Grant Parsons’ opinion column published in the 1/12 edition of the Express.

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Kevin L. Cronk

 
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Thursday, November 18, 2004

Bay Harbor‘s Pollution: Company should Clean up Its Mess

Other Opinions Kevin L. Cronk Little Traverse Bay is the focal point of our regional economy and quality of life. During recent years, the Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council has developed a watershed management plan to protect and improve water quality of the Bay and its tributaries.
Even as the plan was being finalized, an unknown, yet extremely serious water pollution problem was occurring. In what has turned out to be the greatest source of contamination to the Bay in recent history, CMS Energy, Inc. shut down a system that collected contaminated seepage from cement kiln dust (CKD) in Bay Harbor, essentially allowing the polluted water to flow freely into Little Traverse Bay.
Although CMS blames the system shutdown on technical difficulties, a conscious decision was made by somebody to halt operations instead of correcting the problem.
Leachate (contaminated seepage) from the kiln dust pile underneath the Bay Harbor Golf Course, with mercury levels 230 times greater than allowable limits and with a pH value showing the water to be more alkaline than household bleach, was allowed to flow into the Bay for eight months until the problem was uncovered by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.
 
 
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