Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

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Al Parker

 
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Monday, June 16, 2014

Art to be ‘Used and Abused’

Art Al Parker Growing up in Petoskey, Jason Thelen dreamed of being a surfer and riding the big saltwater waves. But fate kept him near fresh water, so he adapted accordingly and began building custom standup paddleboards that “take the big lake’s little waves,” he said.
 
Monday, May 26, 2014

He Works Hard for the Money

Features Al Parker HOW I GOT STARTED I got out of college and traveled west with a backpack full of books, wanting to be a writer. I traveled to San Francisco and on up to Sacramento, Portland, and Seattle…[I worked at] a crappy job and each day I would come back, sit on the steps of that place and do a watercolor of the same mountain.
 
Monday, May 19, 2014

Tackling MultiMedia in a New Way

Art Al Parker THE STORY BEHIND MY ART, MY INSPIRATION I hope people will see the connection between the use of things that might otherwise be discarded and the pollution of our waterways. An annual percentage of the sales from our fish help support environmental groups.
 
Monday, May 12, 2014

Small Things With Great Love

Art Al Parker Some of Liza Fillmore’s greatest works are no more than a half-inch square. The watercolor and acrylic artist paints her tiny naturescapes as a way to deal with the world’s suffering.
 
Monday, May 5, 2014

She’s a Natural

The works of Emmet County artist T.L. Baumhardt often include lush green plants, earthy mushrooms, colorful flowers and – almost always – fairies.

Art Al Parker “I’ve always been fond of fairies, but I must say that I did not consciously choose to paint fairies for a living,” she explains. “They seemed to somehow flutter into my life in a time of need, offering much healing and a fantastic channel for creative expression.
 
Monday, April 21, 2014

The Glass Master

Glass mosaic artist Brian Strickland bucks all kinds of trends. He doesn’t own a computer … or a car.

Art Al Parker My art form of glass mosaics originates from a desire and commitment to transform a ‘concept’ into a ‘tangible reality.’ Frequently my inspiration stems from a particular subject or theme, and on other occasions my imagination is fueled by the scale of a project or dominant color scheme.
 
Monday, April 14, 2014

Heavy Metal

As a Detroit-area sculpture student, David Petrakovitz sold his first piece to Mrs. Edsel Ford.

Art Al Parker Growing up in the Motor City during the heyday of the automotive industry, Petrakovitz developed an avid interest in industrial machinery. He says he sees the raw beauty in their functions and their forms. He features gears, wheels and levers prominently in his creations.
 
Monday, April 7, 2014

Divinely Inspired

As a Catholic schoolgirl in Dearborn, Michelle St. Amant would sit in church services, gazing on the beautiful alabaster figures of saints behind the altar.

Art Al Parker At the age of 10, a friend’s mother invited me to attend an art class at the civic center. We were each given a small lump of clay and told to create whatever we chose with it. I had been fixated on becoming a nun, so I placed my hands at work molding my shapeless mass of clay into a small version of one.
 
Monday, March 31, 2014

A Life of Fiber

Insurance was a less than perfect fit for Marcia Koppa, who left her job when the urge to get creative struck her.

Art Al Parker “About 15 years ago, I felt a real need to do something artistic,” said Koppa, who lives just outside of Grayling. “I tried sketching and found out I couldn’t sketch. So if I couldn’t sketch, how could I possibly paint?” Koppa turned to weaving, turning out hundreds of scarves, vibrant table runners and wall hangings.
 
Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Sochi Winter Olympic Games

The Northern Michigan connection

Features Al Parker Northern Michigan has more than a few ties to the upcoming Sochi Winter Olympic Games, ranging from East Jordan yarns in the U.S. team sweaters to a sports psychologist hailing from our region to Heather Clark, who will be on the slopes of Russia weeks from now.
 
Monday, June 17, 2013

Summer Arts

A round-up of the season’s most creative events

Features Al Parker Art lovers in Northern Michigan can find a high quality show almost every weekend through Labor Day this summer. Here are details on some of the most popular shows and art fairs across the region.
 
Monday, April 1, 2013

Pet Portraits

Shanny Schmidt has a doggone good time portraying pooches

Features Al Parker

Shanny Schmidt has found an art niche that offers something special for animal lovers.

She paints pet portraits, mostly dogs, which feature vibrant colors and unusual poses. Her growing collection of works ranges from Airedales to Wolfhounds and most breeds in between.

 
Monday, July 30, 2012

Grande Vision

Gary Grimshaw's Exhibition of '60s rock posters coming to InsideOut

Features Al Parker While much of America was grooving to the sultry “Summer of Love” sounds in 1967, Detroit was cranking out gritty, raw, pounding music from its epicenter, The Grande Ballroom.
 
Monday, July 9, 2012

There’s Always Something New from Richard Asher

Features Al Parker As a youngster growing up in New York City, Richard Asher’s early artwork drew attention from his teacher. “I doodled on my test papers in elementary school and I got in trouble for it,” he recalls with a laugh. “I was not The Art Kid in my neighborhood.”
 
Monday, February 6, 2012

Real Life

Features Al Parker Since those early Colgate-on-cardboard days, she’s become an award-winning landscape artist whose oil works hang in collections and galleries across the country. At the Northwest Michigan Regional Artists show currently at the Dennos Museum, Saxon’s The Sky Above the Lake.
 
 
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