Letters

Letters 07-27-2015

Next For Brownfields In regard to your recent piece on brownfield redevelopment in TC, the Randolph Street project appears to be proceeding without receiving its requested $600k in brownfield funding from the county. In response to this, the mayor is quoted as saying that the developer bought the property prior to performing an environmental assessment and had little choice but to now build it...

Defending Our Freedom This is in response to Sally MacFarlane Neal’s recent letter, “War Machines for Family Entertainment.” Wake Up! Make no mistake about it, we are at war! Even though the idiot we have for a president won’t accept the fact because he believes we can negotiate with Iran, etc., ISIS and their like make it very clear they intend to destroy the free world as we know it. If you take notice of the way are constantly destroying their own people, is that living...

What Is Far Left? Columnist Steve Tuttle, who so many lambaste as a liberal, considers Sen. Sanders a far out liberal “nearly invisible from the middle.” Has the middle really shifted that far right? Sanders has opposed endless war and the Patriot Act. Does Mr. Tuttle believe most of our citizens praise our wars and the positive results we have achieved from them? Is supporting endless war or giving up our civil liberties middle of the road...

Parking Corrected Stephen Tuttle commented on parking in the July 13 Northern Express. As Director of the Traverse City Downtown Development Authority, I feel compelled to address a couple key issues. But first, I acknowledge that  there is some consternation about parking downtown. As more people come downtown served by less parking, the pressure on what parking we have increases. Downtown serves a county with a population of 90,000 and plays host to over three million visitors annually...

Home · Articles · By Tom Baily

Tom Baily

 
Top Articles from
No articles in this section
Thursday, September 29, 2005

Nature‘s lesson in New Orleans

Other Opinions Tom Baily I write this column two days after Hurricane Katrina brought incalculable devastation to the Gulf Coast and the people of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. I spent last evening glued to the television as I was during the Gulf Wars and on September 11, 2001. Thousands of people need help. Trapped people need rescue. Water, food, shelter, sanitary facilities, and clothing are needed for the displaced and now homeless. Restoration of authority and civility is a priority.
I resist the urge to go to the scene. Having been a first responder in the past - Emergency Medical Technician, firefighter and search-and-rescue worker during my national park ranger days - there’s a temptation to pick up and go. But my last attempt at this sort of thing didn’t work out so well. Years ago, as the world responded to Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait, I noted that the U.S. Navy was taking many vessels out of mothballs in order to deliver supplies and people for what would become the first Gulf War. I called to offer my services as a navigator and, upon providing details, I was politely told that I “exceeded the age requirements” and that the Navy, regrettably, could not accept my enlistment. I understood, perhaps wryly, that one’s time for “doing” in such situations may be limited.
 
 
Close
Close
Close