Letters

Letters 01-26-2015

Food Isn’t What It Was In regards to your article on nutrition being a key weapon for battling cancer, the problem is that much of our food has little nutritional value.

The Real Muslim Issues At least [Express columnist] Tom Kachadurian is being honest when he confesses a long-held family resentment towards Muslims

Applauding Opinions Kudos to the Northern Express for inviting guest editors to write columns. I have enjoyed the timely columns of Scott Hardy particularly

Party For The People One political party opposes minimum wage increases, pushes “right to work” legislation state-to-state, and finds it their mission to eliminate labor unions and the benefits they bring to everyday workers

Big Money Politics Wins Again I’m in agreement with Grant Parsons’ opinion column published in the 1/12 edition of the Express.

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Andy Knott

 
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Thursday, December 27, 2007

Help protect the bay

Other Opinions Andy Knott Dear Friends of Grand Traverse Bay,
We know that you are busy during this holiday season, but we are asking you to take five minutes to send a note to the US EPA to ask that agency to take the most appropriate action to prevent a ground water contamination plume from harming Grand Traverse Bay.
 
Thursday, November 24, 2005

Tribes build muscle to fight for Great Lakes

Features Andy Knott Could an historic alliance of Great Lakes native peoples prevent the destruction of the lakes as we know them today?
“Imagine a future where there are bus tours of shipwrecks on the former bottomlands of the Great Lakes,” says Frank Ettawageshik, Chairman of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians. “We can’t let that happen.”
Ettawageshik is one leader bringing tribes from the U.S. and first nations from Canada together to oppose diversions and large-scale withdrawals from the Great Lakes basin. The nascent group, now called the United Indian Nations of the Great Lakes (UINGL), has met twice during the past year and is forming stronger relationships among themselves and with other groups involved in Great Lakes water protection.
The movement focuses on the future of the Great Lakes, while rooted in history and native tradition that knows no artificial national boundaries.
 
 
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