Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

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Monday, June 15, 2009

Quilt Crazy

Art Carina Hume Quilt Qraze
Tradition clashes with contemporary at Quilts by the Bay show

By Carina Hume 6/15/09

Traditional quilting, born out of necessity, has been around for centuries. But contemporary art quilts – made strictly for art’s sake – are quickly becoming a new and exciting way to express oneself.
“Quilts by the Bay,” showcases both styles at the Petoskey Knights of Columbus Hall, on Friday and Saturday, June 19 and 20.
Monday, June 15, 2009

Kelli Snively

Art Carina Hume Kelli Snively: Art That’s Folksy & Fun

By Carina Hume 6/15/09

Humor is a big part of artist Kelli Snively’s life: Spill a glass of red wine on a new bride? Recreate it in a painting called Two Mad Brides. (She stepped on the other one’s dress.) Have a lovable Welsh corgi with big ears? Make him your muse for numerous paintings.
Well-known for her folksy and caricatured pieces over the last 25 years, the Levering resident brings her fun and sass to downtown Petoskey’s Mitchell Street, Thursday-Saturday each week.
With a bubblegum pink doorway leading to her upstairs studio, art-lovers should have no trouble finding their way.

Monday, May 4, 2009

Puy your best face forward

Features Carina Hume Put Your Best Face Forward
Mother’s Day idea: skin care pampering

By Carina Hume 5/4/09

As a mom, finding time for “me” is scarce. But an opportunity to experience customized skin care from knowledgeable, certified staff, along with skin products that really work and a younger looking me – what’s not to love about that?
I opted for a visit to Cosmetic Skin & Laser Center, with locations in Traverse City and Petoskey.
“Our slogan is, ‘All cosmetic, all the time,’” says Courtney Sumpter, P.A.-C, who is clinical director of both non-surgical centers. “We take care of fine lines, broken blood vessels, brown spots, excessive hair -- just any sort of cosmetic things that are bugging people.”
Monday, April 27, 2009

Spa Happy Hour @ The Inn at Bay Harbor

Features Carina Hume Spa Happy Hour
The Inn at Bay Harbor
offers a healthful alternative

By Carina Hume

If you’re into pampering, grab your girlfriends – or favorite guy – and enjoy a happy hour with a twist. Every Thursday, from 5-8 p.m., The Spa at the Inn at Bay Harbor is treating its patrons to a complimentary drink – including cocktails, wine or non-alcoholic smoothie shots – and light hors d’oeuvres during their appointment. What better way to hang with friends or a significant other after a long day at work?
The Spa’s Happy Hour started in October 2007 and continues to be a popular offering.
Monday, April 27, 2009

Spa Happy Hour @ The Inn at Bay Harbor

Features Carina Hume Spa Happy Hour
The Inn at Bay Harbor
offers a healthful alternative

By Carina Hume

If you’re into pampering, grab your girlfriends – or favorite guy – and enjoy a happy hour with a twist. Every Thursday, from 5-8 p.m., The Spa at the Inn at Bay Harbor is treating its patrons to a complimentary drink – including cocktails, wine or non-alcoholic smoothie shots – and light hors d’oeuvres during their appointment. What better way to hang with friends or a significant other after a long day at work?
The Spa’s Happy Hour started in October 2007 and continues to be a popular offering.
Monday, March 23, 2009

Ski Empire: Boyne Mountain celebrates its 60th anniversary

Features Carina Hume Ski Empire
By Carina Hume 3/23/09

A passion for skiing, a little bit of luck, and the determination and money to make it work. That’s what Everett Kircher possessed. A former Detroit car dealer, Kircher’s vision of a ski club in Northern Michigan began with a one-dollar purchase of 40 acres near Boyne Falls.
Sixty years later, Boyne Mountain is a mega-resort anchoring nine sister resorts in locations as far away as British Columbia, and the Kircher name has its place in skiing history.
In 1947, Everett Kircher and partnersJohn Norton and Jim Christianson formed the Boyne Ski Lodge company. With the purchase of a chairlift from Sun Valley, Idaho, the ski club would introduce the first chairlift in the Midwest, hoping ski enthusiasts would travel north instead of west for their fun.
“Everett Kircher bought a used lift in 1948 in Sun Valley and installed it on the Hemlock slope,” explains Ed Grice, Boyne Mountain’s general manager since 2005. “That lift was the first chairlift in the world transporting skiers at Sun Valley.”
Monday, January 26, 2009

Bill Schwab, Mysteries of light

Art Carina Hume Bill Schwab, Mysteries of light
Carina Hume 1/26/09

Bill Schwab is not your typical picture postcard photographer. You’ll find him practicing his art in weather and lighting conditions most photographers run from. “I like to show ways people aren’t used to looking at the world,” says this year’s juror for Crooked Tree Arts Center’s 28th Juried Photography Show in Petoskey.
Working at nighttime and in inclement weather has become somewhat of a trademark for Schwab, a Dearborn and Cross Village resident. “People don’t think of it as being a good time to photograph,” he admits, “but there’s ambient light. The camera tends to pick up more than the eye does – it can be mysterious. It adds to the emotional impact, shot in a snowstorm or at nighttime.”
Monday, October 27, 2008

Jordan River Arts Council

Art Carina Hume By showcasing creative art exhibits, live theater and hands-on art projects in the schools for the past 20 years, Jordan River Arts Council’s mission is simple – to bring the arts to Antrim and southern Charlevoix counties.
Housed in a brick, 1900s-built former Carnegie Library, with two galleries, original leaded windows and restored wood interior, the arts council’s Jordan River Art Center anchors the north end of East Jordan’s Main Street.
After celebrating its longevity with a late-summer, 20-year anniversary exhibit and member picnic, JRAC continues to focus on its future.

Formed in 1988, with Fran Pletz as its first president, the council quickly attained 115 members and gathered a volunteer board. Artist Pat Tinney designed JRAC’s lady slipper logo, which remains its logo to this day.
“I came in shortly after it was founded,” says Howard Ellis, a former president (three times) of JRAC and membership coordinator for the last seven years. “I was not a founding member because I had to work that night,” he says with a laugh.
Today, council memberships are close to 300 and provide a good portion of the council’s funding, as well as art education grants.
“With 292 members we do quite well membership-wise,” says Ellis. “People are very kind and generous. We really don’t go out and advertise – it’s almost by word of mouth.”
The diverse board consists of artists, lawyers and other professionals. “Everyone’s volunteer,” says Ellis. “We have really good working members. we really have to all pitch in.”
Monday, September 22, 2008

Sculpting a life: Jim Miller-Melberg

Art Carina Hume Walk into Petoskey’s Crooked Tree Arts Center and you’ll think you’ve walked into a sculpture garden. Taking over the art center entrance and Edith Gilbert Gallery is an in-your-face art installation by sculptor Jim Miller-Melberg. With vivid colors, stark whites and eye-catching forms, this exhibit is striking enough to captivate even the youngest child.
Follow Miller-Melberg’s life through early sketches – including figures, nature and sculptural concepts – maquettes, small-scale sculpture from which larger pieces evolve, and the finished product, through November 15, in the exhibit, titled “Jim Miller-Melberg: An autobiography in drawings & sculpture, 1946-2008.”
Nearly 100 working sketches and photos of finished outdoor sculptures are framed in collages on the walls, combined with 40 pieces of sculpture, including sculpture in the round and relief sculptures (three-dimensional wall pieces).
Monday, September 22, 2008

Toski Sands

Dining Carina Hume For the past 40 years Toski Sands has been serving up the best in choice meats, fresh produce and hard-to-find ethnic goods in its handy location between Petoskey and Harbor Springs. Named after Northern Michigan’s recreational offerings – “to ski” and “sands” – Toski Sands was built by Dale Bradley and George Gerrie, who opened the separate market and party store businesses in April 1968.
Current owners Sue and Keith McGlaughlin are happy to continue the stores’ traditions of offering a wide variety of product, friendly service and small-store convenience.
“One of the nicest things about a market this size is we pack so many great items into such a small space,” says Keith McGlaughlin. “You can pull up to the door, we’ll guide you through the store if you want and even bring your groceries to your car. It’s the old-school way, with a total focus on customer service.”
Monday, August 25, 2008

A day in Mackinaw City

Features Carina Hume Looking for a local day-away destination that won’t empty your pockets or your gas tank? Hop in your car and head to Mackinaw City where you can glimpse the beautiful lakes, the “Mighty” Mackinac Bridge, and just enjoy what this popular tourist mecca has to offer. With plenty of options for every budget, visitors can spend the day touring historic venues, shopping, dining, sampling fudge and ice cream or just hanging around.
For many centuries, the Mackinac Straits were one of the most important crossroads in North America; first with the Indians who gathered here in their migrations through the region and later with the French voyageurs and British traders who established forts and trading posts. Fort Michilimackinac was established in 1715 as a trading post and was the site of a famous massacre. Another larger fort on nearby Mackinac Island played a key role in the fate of thousands of square miles in the War of 1812. Everywhere you walk at the Straits resonates with history.
Monday, August 18, 2008

Something fishy in Oden

Features Carina Hume Ever wonder how area lakes and streams stay stocked with brightly colored trout for area anglers? Stop in at the Michigan Fisheries Visitor Center, located in Oden, just north of Petoskey, and find out.
With interactive learning displays, a replica of an old fish railcar to tour, natural trout stream and half-mile-long nature trail that leads to the Oden State Fish Hatchery, getting back to nature is fun and free. Daily tours at the modern facility, completed in June 2002, explain why hatcheries are necessary, how fish are raised and what happens to them as they mature.
“We raise brown trout and rainbow trout here,” says Maureen Jacobs, park interpreter with the Department of Natural Resources. “We do about 250,000 rainbows every year and about 750,000 browns that we end up releasing into our lakes, rivers and streams.”
The original Oden Hatchery was built in 1920 with fish ponds surrounding the building.
Monday, August 4, 2008

Charlevoix Art Fair

Art Carina Hume Fine art treasures and a lakefront setting make Charlevoix’s Waterfront Art Fair a summer crowd-pleaser. Returning to the newly-completed downtown East Park on the shores of Charlevoix’s Round Lake, the art fair is celebrating its 50th anniversary on August 9.
Nearly 130 artists from as far away as Florida and New York offer visitors one-of-a-kind pieces. “The artists juried into the show present a range of art that is affordable to the first time art buyer and also includes pieces that are desired by the experienced art collector,” says Mary Beth McGraw, director of the art fair and president of the Charlevoix Council for the Arts.
Monday, August 4, 2008

Visit the Mackinaw

Features Carina Hume Ten days after Pearl Harbor was bombed, the funds were allocated to build the U.S. Coast Guard Icebreaker Mackinaw. With delivery of iron ore during World War II a necessity, a reliable ship to keep the Great Lakes’ shipping lanes open was essential. The 290 ft. long cutter took three years to build, cost $10 million and was commissioned on December 20, 1944.
Sixty-two years later, in June 2006, the Mackinaw left its lifelong port of Cheboygan and found a new home in Mackinaw City, its namesake. Opened in 2007 as a maritime museum, the Icebreaker Mackinaw continues to share tales of its storied past.
Monday, June 9, 2008

Cheboygan‘s Opera House

Features Carina Hume Forget contemporary and cold. The Cheboygan Opera House’s charm is in its historic Victorian design, with roots going back to 1877. With red velvet drapes, three concentric arches, velour seats and exceptional acoustics, patrons can experience the grandeur of the past.