Letters

Letters 12-14-2014

Come Together There is a time-honored war strategy known as “divide and conquer,” and never has it been more effective than now. The enemy is using it against us through television, internet and other social media. I opened a Facebook account a couple of years back to gain more entries in local contests. Since then I had fallen under its spell; I rushed into judgment on several social issues based on information found on those pages

Quiet The Phones! This weekend we attended two beautiful Christmas musical events and the enjoyment of both were significantly diminished by self-absorbed boors holding their stupid iPhones high overhead to capture extremely crucial and highly needed photos. We too own iPhones, but during a public concert we possess the decency and manners to leave them turned off and/or at home. Today’s performance, the annual Messiah Sing at Traverse City’s Central Methodist Church, was a new low: we watched as Mr. Self-Absorbed not only took several photos but then afterwards immediately posted them to his Facebook page. We were dumbfounded.

A Torturous Defense In defense of the C.I.A.’s use of torture in a mostly fruitless search for vital information, some suggest that the dire situation facing us after 9-11, justified the use of torture even at the expense of the potential loss of much of our nation’s moral authority.

Home · Articles · By Nicole Wildman

Nicole Wildman

 
Top Articles from
No articles in this section
Monday, August 10, 2009

Beats for books

Music Nicole Wildman Beats for Books
Hip-hop concert to benefit school in Ethiopia

By Nicole Wildman 8/10/09

What do coffee farmers in third world countries have to do with hip-hop? Everything, in the eyes of Rachel Lipscomb of Traverse City, who is helping to organize a Beats for Books concert benefit held at InsideOut Gallery of Traverse City, this Sunday.
Currently working in the café at Oryana, Rachel, 25, went to school for photography. She’s done a lot of traveling, including being part of a delegation to Chiapas, Mexico, along with staff from Higher Grounds Trading Company of Traverse City, for a project to provide water to the community.
“My experiences have helped me to strongly believe in social and economic justice,” Lipscomb says. These beliefs have materialized in the form of Beats for Books, a benefit to raise funds to build a school in Yrgacheffe, Ethiopia, a project which Chris Treter of Higher Grounds has been working on for a few years.
 
Monday, March 3, 2008

My disillusionment with traditional medicine

Other Opinions Nicole Wildman My disillusionment with traditional medicine started shortly after I quit my job of four years as a hospital unit clerk. I began to see for the first time just how much the medical community at large is motivated by fear.
That fear leads some doctors to micro-manage every symptom, treating everything with a different pill. I saw patients taking pills to allay the side effects of their other pills. Then there was the failure I saw taking place in my own family. I watched my husband taking Naproxen every day for the “arthritis” in his wrists (he’s 28 years old); I saw my kids having repeated ear infections, chronic coughing, asthma, constipation... and the very unpleasant side effects of the repeated antibiotics, oral and inhaled steroids for a three-year-old... and still, the problems didn’t go away.
 
 
Close
Close
Close