Northern Express - Art http://www.northernexpress.com/michigan/articles.sec-148-1-art.html <![CDATA[Kevin Nealon’s Not Overwhelmed - ]]> only 8:30am in Los Angeles, but if Kevin Nealon isn’t a morning person, you’d never know it by the cheerful voice on the other end of the phone. Comedian/actor Nealon, whose specialties include observational comedy and satire, is embarking on a U.S. stand-up tour in a few days.]]> <![CDATA[Father and son team up with boat kits - ]]> Al Jankowski has been enamored with boats most of his life, a trait he passed to his son Kurt. Now the two are sharing that love with others through the Old Mission Boat Company, a startup that sells boat kits. The hook: They say the boats are designed so that someone can start the build one weekend and have it in the water the next.]]> <![CDATA[Two by Tennessee - Plays by Williams Set to Take the Stage at Interlochen and Parallel 45 Theatre]]> American playwright Tennessee Williams may have been slow to success, toiling for years before receiving any recognition, but once he hit it, he really hit it with a series of plays that are considered stage essentials even today, with many of them also adapted to film.]]> <![CDATA[Gene Jenneman Shifting Focus at the Dennos - ]]> Rumors fly fast in northern Michigan. Lately, one of the rumor mill’s favorite subjects has been the Dennos Museum’s longtime Executive Director Gene Jenneman; the grapevine says he’s stepping down. While Jenneman is definitely looking toward the future, his next step is merely a shifting of roles, not an entire changing of the guard.]]> <![CDATA[Frank Caliendo: A Career in Comedy - ]]> Frank Caliendo’s career includes plenty of tomfoolery, or should we say Frankfoolery? You’ve probably seen the American comedian and actor on any number of shows, especially if you’re a sports fan; in addition to appearances on MADtv, The Bob and...]]> <![CDATA[The Moth Mainstage - ]]> The Moth Mainstage is a non-scripted, but carefully constructed, show all about true stories — true stories told live, onstage and without prompters or notes. At each performance, a selection of curated storytellers from all walks of life share their personal vignettes uniting under one theme.]]> <![CDATA[Getting Wild at CTAC - ]]> WILD WORKS As curated by artists Dani Knoph and Courtney Michalik, Wildhearted: A Fresh Take on Northern Michigan’s Environment will feature a selection of environmentally-conscious artists and creative professionals who are aiming at pushing the boundaries of artistic convention.]]> <![CDATA[Art Identity - ]]> Ontario-born William H. White came to northern Michigan in 1859 to manage a sawmill in East Jordan. In 1881, that business failed and White was out $600 in wages; he was given $450 in merchandise in lieu of earnings. In January 1883, he shipped his goods by sleigh, over 4 feet of snow, to Boyne City.]]> <![CDATA[Handmade Michigan - Selling Your Wares Online]]> Whether you’re a consumer of handcrafted goods or you create your own, chances are you’re looking for somewhere to buy or sell them.]]> <![CDATA[Author James Rollins' Unique Method - ]]> A 500-year-old mummy that’s not supposed to be there; solar flares triggering huge natural disasters; a derelict Russian scientific base buried, with many of its secrets, in an iceberg; gun-toting special ops soldiers trained to understand and...]]> <![CDATA[Meet The Art Guy: Paul LaPorte - ]]> If you’ve ever listened to WTCM Radio, visited the Crooked Tree Arts Center or attended any number of local art events, chances are your path has crossed with Paul LaPorte’s.]]> <![CDATA[For the Love of Rust - ]]> “I saw this old Ford truck sitting deserted in the woods and took a photo of it,” she said. “And one time I sent my granddaughter to a junkyard to get me photos of old cars. Then I work from the photos. In addition to the cars, I really love doing portraits.]]> <![CDATA[Sheryl Langdon's Beautiful Balancing Act - ]]> “When I’m making jewelry, certain stones literally seem to tell me what to do with them,” she said. “I try to balance the raw with the refined, the heavy with the iridescent, the old with the new, the dull with the sparkle to help them to be seen in a different and elegant way.]]> <![CDATA[Emmet County’s Biggest Fan Beth Eckerle - ]]> One way to honor state, county or municipal employees who have helped preserve Michigan’s history beyond the duties of their official jobs is by presenting them with the Michigan Historical Commission’s Governor John B. Swainson Award.]]> <![CDATA[Don Butkovich and the Art of Appreciating Art - ]]> His resume is encyclopedic and includes accomplishments logged across Michigan and the northeastern United States and Canada, and it also details his expertise in numerous artistic mediums. Today, imbued with the wisdom of a life fully lived, he quietly runs Don Butkovich Antiques & Appraisals from his Traverse City home.]]> <![CDATA[John Krieger and His Many Bodies of Work - ]]> Now retired from the car game, he’s gone from designing fins on cars to designing fins on fish, his recent specialty. His colorful, unique fish are made of the same clay used in car models and they range in size from about 3 to 10 feet long, although recently he’s been asked to create a couple of fiberglass fish in the 20- to 25-foot range.]]> <![CDATA[Wool by the Pound - ]]> If you watched the 2014 Winter Olympics closing ceremonies, you saw one of the products of Stonehedge Fiber Mill. The East Jordan company produced nearly 3,000 pounds of yarn for Ralph Lauren in spring 2013 to be used for the sweaters the designer created for the games.]]> <![CDATA[Learning From Accidents - ]]> Tom (T.J.) Krueger is uniformly informal when he creates his innovative pieces at his Greilickville studio. “I like to work in my three-piece suit,” he laughed. “T-shirt, shorts and sandals.” Krueger is a bundle of energy, always in motion, and his works display that restless spirit.]]> <![CDATA[Kris Ellis Ritter – An Artist at Play - ]]> Growing up she was anything but the “art kid” in school. “I had my first discouragement in kindergarten when my teacher leaned over the corner of a table yelling ‘No, no, no, Kristine. Don’t do it like that. Do it like her!’” she recalled. “I put my crushed sense of self away and did the picture like the other girl.]]> <![CDATA[Northern Michigan Heads South to ArtPrize - ]]> Ann Loveless returns to Grand Rapids ArtPrize this month, two years after she won the popular vote in the prestigious competition, taking home $200,000 for her 20-foot-long, four-panel quilted rendition of a Sleeping Bear Dunes sunset. This time, Loveless and husband Steve have made a joint submission that merges her quilting and his photography.]]>