Northern Express - Dining http://www.northernexpress.com/michigan/articles.sec-152-1-dining.html <![CDATA[Maureen Abood's Hot Weather Treats - ]]> Pulling from the kitchen traditions and exotic ingredients of her Lebanese heritage, Maureen Abood’s recipes and food memories have been published and lauded everywhere from The New York Times and Chicago Tribune to NPR and Saveur magazine.]]> <![CDATA[Gaijin - East Meets Midwest - ]]> Thanks to gastro-entrepreneur Simon Joseph, your culinary horizons, your cultural insight, and your food vocabulary are all about to expand. Or they may have already, if you’re one of the lucky ones who has discovered Gaijin, Traverse City’s first and only Japanese ramen shop, since it opened on June 10 on Front Street in downtown Traverse City.]]> <![CDATA[Etta’s Diner - ]]> These were the steps that led Steve Erber to his latest venture: the expansion of the aforementioned Etta’s Food Truck to the brick-and-mortar Etta’s Diner in Harbor Springs, where he’s serving up eclectic recipes inspired by his grandmother Henrietta Thompson, stuffed full of fresh, locallysourced ingredients.]]> <![CDATA[Short's Brewery Rolls in the Dough - ]]> Pizza is everywhere in northern Michigan and across America. So it’s a challenge for any restaurant, pub, or pizza place to make their pie standout. Popular local microbrew destination Short’s Brewing Company found a way, and all it took was looking in their own proverbial backyard.]]> <![CDATA[Sodalicious - ]]> Jordan couple Debbie and Marty Carey have long run a successful ice cream and broasted chicken stop, Marty’s Cones and Carry Out, on one side of the Jordan River. But when they spotted a building in need of renovation on the other side of the riverbank, they knew just what to do with it:.]]> <![CDATA[The Main Man At Main Street Market - ]]> Gary Kosch might blanch at the label, but he is in fact the main man at the Main Street Market, as well as several other establishments.]]> <![CDATA[Sugar Bowl - ]]> When Wendy Fleming took on a parttime job at the Sugar Bowl during Alpenfest just out of college years ago, waiting tables and bartending, she didn’t plan to stick around long, and she certainly never dreamed she would still be here a quarter of a century later.]]> <![CDATA[Stormcloud Bright Skies Ahead - ]]> Situated next to the nearly century-old Garden Theater in downtown Frankfort, just two blocks from Lake Michigan, Stormcloud Brewing Company is a reincarnation of another famous local landmark, albeit in a completely new guise.]]> <![CDATA[Nonna Lisa’s - ]]> Named after owner Joe Lieghio’s grandmother, Nonna Lisa’s is the place to go in Mackinaw City for Italian cuisine, woodfired pizzas, and some of the most unusual décor you’ll see at a northern Michigan restaurant.]]> <![CDATA[Simply Sweet by Jessica - ]]> Jessica Stubbs’ love for baking started close to home in 2012. Baking casually for family members and friends at church was something that Stubbs found immediately rewarding, so when some local nonprofit organizations and country clubs asked if she baked for special events, the answer was a swift yes.]]> <![CDATA[Boyne Appétit - ]]> When Cynthia Boal Janssens moved to Boyne City a couple of years ago, she was stunned to find that the culture in her new adopted hometown was a lot more expansive than she’d anticipated. “I found out that for a small town of less than 4,000 people, we have so, so many great restaurants and food purveyors!” Janssens said.]]> <![CDATA[North Country Grille And Pub - ]]> BUILDING ON A LEGACY “I love the restaurant business. I’ve been in it for 30 years, starting as a server at Boone’s Prime Time Pub in 1986, and I can’t imagine doing anything else,” said Boone, wife of the late restaurateur Barry Boone, a man who...]]> <![CDATA[Eco Smoothie Cafe - ]]> Ryan Nelson started doing restaurant work when he was 14 years old, snagging a youth work permit so he could take a job at the Flapjack Family Restaurant in Petoskey.]]> <![CDATA[Taproot Cider House - ]]> “When any part of the tree is weakening, the taproot goes down even further to find more nourishment. That’s kind of how I feel about my business. We are like the taproot and the community is the tree. We are here to nourish it and help keep it healthy and strong.]]> <![CDATA[A Showcase of Restaurants - ]]> Signature Dishes: On the breakfast side, The Farmer’s Omelette (three eggs loaded with sausage, hash browns, onions, mushrooms, cheddar cheese and tomatoes) and the Irish Omelette (corned beef, American fries, green peppers, onions and Swiss cheese, with a side of sour cream.]]> <![CDATA[Terry’s Place - ]]> FRENCH FORMALITY In 1981, Left opened Great Lakes Fish and Chips in Charlevoix, which he soon expanded into the Villager Pub. Next up was Terry’s Place, in the same building, named to impart a casual flair, as if you were just dropping by Left’s house for a friendly dinner.]]> <![CDATA[Spike’s Keg O’ Nails - ]]> They call it Home of the Spikeburger, The Meeting Place of the North and The Friendliest Place in Town. Spike’s Keg O’ Nails has collected a lot of nicknames over its whopping 83 years in business — and its popular Friday night fish fry is nothing to sneeze at, either.]]> <![CDATA[The Tribune - Making Headlines in Northport ]]> Even for those who live in northwest Michigan, it wouldn’t be a stretch to say the village of Northport is off the beaten path; its own website calls it “Leelanau County’s bestkept secret.” Eric Alchinn, operating partner/ head cook at The Tribune, one of the newest restaurants in this charming waterfront hamlet, concedes, “It’s true.]]> <![CDATA[The Noggin Room - ]]> The Perry Hotel has a long and storied history, starting in 1899 when it was built as one of 20 luxury resort hotels in Petoskey. Today, it’s the only one of those 20 still in operation and it’s diversified its offerings by adding three levels of restaurants to its properties: one upscale, one outdoors and one very popular pub.]]> <![CDATA[Forty Acres Tavern - ]]> Boyne USA founder, the late Everett Kircher, knew a good thing when he saw it. Upon deciding he wanted to open a ski resort in northern Michigan, he dug through a pile of topographical maps and locked in on a 1,150-foot hill. The owner was Boyne Falls logger turned Michigan senator William Pearson.]]>