Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

Topic: boat
Monday, April 2, 2012

Motor, Paddle or Sail: Boating Season Looks Bright

Features Patrick Sullivan A couple of years ago, the economy looked grim and prospects for the annual boat show in TC looked dead in the water. Who was going to buy a new boat in the middle of an economic meltdown?

'It was ’09 when, at least from our perspective, the industry hit bottom," said Andrew MacDonald, whose company Blue Water Promotions has run the Traverse City Boat Show for seven years. "It was very tough, it was almost panic, and we haven’t seen anything close to that since."

 
Monday, March 24, 2014

Great Lakes Boating is Back

Features Becky Kalajian “I think the typical boat buyer might be in a stronger position financially, whether they’re looking for new or used,” said Stover, who sells new and used boats worldwide. “Others have been sitting on the sidelines for a few years; now it’s time to participate.
 
Monday, April 7, 2014

Rollin’ Down the River, Beautifully

River drifters and fly fishers, get on the wait list now: It takes three months to build a custom Croff Craft drift boat.

Features Kristi Kates “In every boat I build there is a lot of blood, sweat, and tears … literally. I am the designer, engineer, builder, and finish guy,” he said. “But I absolutely love what I do, and try very hard to make that love show itself in the finished product.”.
 
Monday, June 2, 2014

The Only One in the World

Walloon Lake Sails It’s Own Way

Features Bekah Klarr In 1973, Schach took the new fiberglass molds to a commercial boat builder in Grand River, Ohio named McLeod Boat Works. McLeod built six more boats which were assembled at the Walloon Landing Marina. After that, the molds were moved to a boat builder in Toledo, Ohio, who produced six more 17s.
 
Monday, June 2, 2014

Boyne City’s Unearthly Luxury

In almost 40 years, only 50 über-luxe Van Dam yachts and powerboats have left the family-owned shop.

Features Becky Kalajian The 16,000-sq.-ft. shop, a former marina storage business on 16 acres, houses metal fabrication, a paint area, and construction. The two-story construction site is littered with hand tools and some bigger machinery, all of which Van Dam bought used along the way.
 
Monday, June 2, 2014

Water Worlds

Features Ross Boissoneau The Grand Rapids couple is based out of Duncan Bay Marina in Cheboygan, but they spend most of their summer anywhere and everywhere on the Great Lakes. They often visit ports along the eastern portion of Lake Huron and northern coastline of Lake Superior in Canada.
 
Monday, July 14, 2014

Eight Days of Totally Free Fun: Venetian Fest 2014

Features Kristi Kates

Venetian festivals, primarily a Midwestern phenomenon, have been lighting up the water for decades … but none longer than Charlevoix’s. The 84-year-old festival has matured through the years, growing from a single evening’s candlelit boat parade to an eight-day festival of free-to-the-public games, music, and the hugely popular fireworks.

 
Monday, September 8, 2014

Twice the Fun at Hops and Props

There’s beer and boats … and then there’s hops and props.

Music Kristi Kates The breweries will be arriving from all over Michigan, and will include brews from Bells, Dark Horse, Shorts, Founders, Mitten, Hideout, North Peak, Rochester Mills, New Holland, and Arcadia Brewing Companies, plus offerings from The Livery, Douglas Valley Winery, Bardic Wells Meadery, Virtue Cider, and many more.
 
Monday, April 6, 2015

Four “Waves” at the TC Boat Show

Features Kristi Kates “Increased power and streamlined engineering have made them much more appealing to the market,” MacDonald explained. Tri-tubes — which add an extra pontoon to the middle of the boat — make today’s pontoon boats far more stable, and that’s only one of many new features.
 
 
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