Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Topic: farm
Monday, November 21, 2011

Which Way the Wind Blows

Features Patrick Sullivan Penny and Shandy Spencer spent around $74,000 to construct a 112-foot windmill that rises above their lavender farm north of Cedar. They got the windmill last November in response to federal incentives and because they wanted to generate sustainable, green energy, even if it cost more than electricity from fossil fuels.
 
Monday, October 15, 2012

Corn Maze Mania

How I got lost and found in a field of corn

Features Erin Crowell

For awhile, all I hear is the rustling of dry corn stalks in the wind. Then, I hear the laughter of a child somewhere toward the west. I can’t see anyone, but I know they are wandering like me through this maze of maize.

 
Monday, May 26, 2014

Labor of Love at Light of Day

Dining Kristi Kates CALL TO WELLNESS Founded 10 years ago on the Traverse City land that Macke calls home, Light of Day started small, with just a few crops: peppermint, chamomile, raspberry leaf, and spearmint. It was expanded later to a full farm on M-72 near Sleeping Bear Dunes.
 
Monday, September 1, 2014

The Sweet Smell of Success at Lavender Hill Farm

Features Kristi Kates FRESH FARM While neither Linda nor Roy Longworth had any farming background prior to buying the land that would become Lavender Hill, they loved to garden and, most of all, felt a sense of urgency upon hearing that the farm property would be sold at auction.
 
Monday, September 22, 2014

Where Have All the Workers Gone?

Features Patrick Sullivan The dramatic decrease in northern Michigan’s migrant worker population in recent years can be attributed to many factors, but, regardless of the reasons, there is no question this trend could change the face of the region’s signature fruit industry, making the way we harvest cherries, wine grapes, apples, peaches and berries a thing of the past.
 
Monday, October 20, 2014

Hearth and Vine a Hidden Jewel

Features Ross Boissoneau Hearth and Vine takes the farm to table concept seriously. And why wouldn’t it, with the farm right outside its door? Many of the items on the menu are derived from the animals and vegetables that call the farm home, much to Chef Jonathan Dayton’s delight.
 
Sunday, December 14, 2014

A Depression-Era Christmas at Wellington Farm

Features Kristi Kates DRAMATIC EFFECT The catalyst for making it “more” was a real life event that took place at Wellington many years ago.
 
Monday, April 6, 2015

Rolling Farms Offers Fresh, Tasty Bounty From the Land

Dining Ross Boissoneau “We have lettuce, potatoes, squash, pumpkins, berries, corn,” says Roller. “We use it all here or donate it to Father Fred. Food should be a right, not a privilege. We grow some extra things (for donations) like honeydew, cantaloupe, beans, snap peas. Plant it, grow it, use it,” Roller says with a smile.
 
Monday, April 20, 2015

Food Sovereignty for the Odawa

Features Kristi Kates TROUBLING TREATIES “Before the land session treaties of 1836 and 1855, the Odawa tribe was self-sufficient, growing our own food, supporting and maintaining ourselves,” explained John Keshick III, Odawa Tribal Council member and also a member of the LTBB’s ad hoc Agricultural Workgroup crew.
 
 
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