Letters

Letters 04-13-2015

Perplexing Eighth Street Changes I’m writing to you about the way 8th Street in Traverse City is organized. I commute on 8th Street daily like hundreds of others.

115 Years of Injustice Investigative reporter Pat Sullivan’s March 23 article “BURNOUT” exposed for the first time to many northern Michigan residents the 115-year-old tragedy that took place at Burt Lake in October of 1900.

Kicking The Prop 1 Can “Proposal 1 consists of only 100 words, but if approved by voters on May 5, it would trigger into law thousands of other words in 10 bills passed by the state legislature in December.”

Expose The Republican Playbook There was much angst among Democratic Party loyalists after the November election about their failure to convey a strong populist message.

Unions Are Essential Thanks to Stephen Tuttle for pointing out in his recent column how we have had trade apprenticeships for decades throughout Michigan and other states.

Topic: farm
Monday, November 21, 2011

Which Way the Wind Blows

Features Patrick Sullivan Penny and Shandy Spencer spent around $74,000 to construct a 112-foot windmill that rises above their lavender farm north of Cedar. They got the windmill last November in response to federal incentives and because they wanted to generate sustainable, green energy, even if it cost more than electricity from fossil fuels.
 
Monday, October 15, 2012

Corn Maze Mania

How I got lost and found in a field of corn

Features Erin Crowell

For awhile, all I hear is the rustling of dry corn stalks in the wind. Then, I hear the laughter of a child somewhere toward the west. I can’t see anyone, but I know they are wandering like me through this maze of maize.

 
Monday, May 26, 2014

Labor of Love at Light of Day

Dining Kristi Kates CALL TO WELLNESS Founded 10 years ago on the Traverse City land that Macke calls home, Light of Day started small, with just a few crops: peppermint, chamomile, raspberry leaf, and spearmint. It was expanded later to a full farm on M-72 near Sleeping Bear Dunes.
 
Monday, September 1, 2014

The Sweet Smell of Success at Lavender Hill Farm

Features Kristi Kates FRESH FARM While neither Linda nor Roy Longworth had any farming background prior to buying the land that would become Lavender Hill, they loved to garden and, most of all, felt a sense of urgency upon hearing that the farm property would be sold at auction.
 
Monday, September 22, 2014

Where Have All the Workers Gone?

Features Patrick Sullivan The dramatic decrease in northern Michigan’s migrant worker population in recent years can be attributed to many factors, but, regardless of the reasons, there is no question this trend could change the face of the region’s signature fruit industry, making the way we harvest cherries, wine grapes, apples, peaches and berries a thing of the past.
 
Monday, October 20, 2014

Hearth and Vine a Hidden Jewel

Features Ross Boissoneau Hearth and Vine takes the farm to table concept seriously. And why wouldn’t it, with the farm right outside its door? Many of the items on the menu are derived from the animals and vegetables that call the farm home, much to Chef Jonathan Dayton’s delight.
 
Sunday, December 14, 2014

A Depression-Era Christmas at Wellington Farm

Features Kristi Kates DRAMATIC EFFECT The catalyst for making it “more” was a real life event that took place at Wellington many years ago.
 
Monday, April 6, 2015

Rolling Farms Offers Fresh, Tasty Bounty From the Land

Dining Ross Boissoneau “We have lettuce, potatoes, squash, pumpkins, berries, corn,” says Roller. “We use it all here or donate it to Father Fred. Food should be a right, not a privilege. We grow some extra things (for donations) like honeydew, cantaloupe, beans, snap peas. Plant it, grow it, use it,” Roller says with a smile.
 
 
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