Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Topic: games
Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Sochi Winter Olympic Games

The Northern Michigan connection

Features Al Parker Northern Michigan has more than a few ties to the upcoming Sochi Winter Olympic Games, ranging from East Jordan yarns in the U.S. team sweaters to a sports psychologist hailing from our region to Heather Clark, who will be on the slopes of Russia weeks from now.
 
Monday, April 6, 2015

Benzie Grad Rides Statistical Wave to Big Leagues

Features Ross Boissoneau The rise of baseball sabermetrics has taken things a step further, giving attention to even more complex statistical analyses, such as WHIP (walks plus hits per inning pitched), BABIP (batting average on balls in play) and VORP (value over replacement player).
 
Saturday, October 10, 2015

Top Board Games for Fall Fun!

Features None Amazon’s top-selling table games include Monopoly, Battleship, The Game of Life and Trivial Pursuit. Then there’s Scrabble, the classic word-building game that just won’t die; it’s said that one-third of American homes have a Scrabble set. The game is produced in 29 languages and sold in 121 countries.
 
Saturday, October 10, 2015

The War Room

Features Kristi Kates Onaway, Mich., native Wayne Berry moved to Traverse City in 1999 to open TC Paintball, a center for the faux-combat game where participants use air guns to shoot capsules of paint at each other, usually at complex outdoor terrain fields that help enhance the illusion of an actual battle.
 
Saturday, October 10, 2015

Videogame Ventures

Features Kristi Kates While California’s Silicon Valley is still the hub for most videogame developers, including Activision, Sega, Eidos Interactive, Capcom and Blizzard, other regions of the U.S. are beginning to develop games, too — from Oregon to New Jersey to Michigan.
 
 
Close
Close
Close