Letters

Letters 07-25-2016

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

Topic: mackinac
Monday, July 16, 2012

War!

British invaders overwhelmed Mackinac 200 years ago this week

Features Patrick Sullivan

British soldiers didn’t take Mackinac Island entirely by surprise 200 years ago, though they may as well have.

When the British invaded on July 17, 1812, they found the Americans unprepared because news of the war had not yet reached this frontier outpost, even though President James Madison had declared war on the British a month earlier.

 
Saturday, May 30, 2015

Beautiful Blooms

Features Kristi Kates The 66th annual fest will run June 5-14 this year, in sync with the lilacs’ own schedule. Some of the flowers have already begun to bloom, but the majority should be in full force by festival week if the Chamber of Commerce has anything to say about it.
 
Friday, August 28, 2015

15 Fun Facts About the Mackinac Bridge Walk

Features Kristi Kates You say potato, I say potahto… Mackinac Island was considered shaped like a turtle, so it was given the early Native American name Michilimackinac (Great Turtle), a moniker that eventually came to represent the entire Straits of Mackinac region. By the early 1800s, it was shortened to Mackinac.
 
Saturday, May 28, 2016

Spring Abloom

Features Kristi Kates What plant is native to the Balkan Peninsula, is the state flower of New Hampshire, was the subject of a famous painting by Edouard Manet… and is the honoree of a major festival right here in northern Michigan? None other than that bountiful, perfumed spring bloom of the north, the lilac.
 
Saturday, June 25, 2016

Not Your Typical 4th in the North

Features Kristi Kates Parades, picnics, bright fireworks and sunny beach days. Block parties, barbecues, hot dogs and ice cream. They’re all essentials for a classic Fourth of July celebration.
 
Saturday, July 2, 2016

Oh Fudge!

Features By most accounts, the first batch of fudge was concocted in Baltimore in the 1880s. It wasn’t long after that when father and son Henry and Jerome “Rome” Murdick were commissioned to create canvas awnings for the new Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island.
 
Saturday, July 9, 2016

History Underwater

Features Kristi Kates There is an incredible amount of history beneath the Great Lakes’ depths, and scuba divers are some of the people who know the lore best. As they descend into the fresh waters that we are all so familiar with, ghosts of the past slowly come into view: hulking freighters and broken masts.
 
 
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