Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Topic: science
Monday, July 9, 2012

Dr. Pulp Fiction

Garyn Roberts delves deep into mystery & science fiction

Features Patrick Sullivan

When science fiction writer Ray Bradbury died last month, the world mourned the loss of a literary giant.

Northwestern Michigan College professor Garyn Roberts mourned the loss of a friend.

Roberts, an English instructor at Northwestern Michigan College, has been working on a biography of Bradbury and grew close to the author over the years. Recently, the Express sat down with Roberts to talk about Bradbury, science fiction and other literary forms that grew out of the “pulp” publications of the early 20th Century.

 
Monday, April 7, 2014

Fusing Science and Magic

Features Kristi Kates “I’m super excited to be going to Kirtland [Center for Performing Arts]; I love touring Michigan and the Midwest,” Pogson said. “There is such a rich history from the old vaudeville days. It’s going to be a night of laughs, to say the least!”.
 
Monday, March 2, 2015

Letters 03-02-2015

Letters

American Exceptualism Rudy Giuliani was espousing his opinion to Fox News that Barack Obama did not love America and didn’t brag enough about “American Exceptionalism.”

Fur Is Not Chic When my 25-pound dog stepped in a toothed steel leg hold trap a few ft off the trail, I learned how “unchic” fur is. I had to carry her out two miles to get to a vet.

Which Is More Dangerous? Just a couple of thoughts I had in response to the letters by Gordon Lee Dean and Jarin Weber in the Feb. 23 issue. Mr. Dean claims that there have been zero deaths from the measles in the past ten years.

Real Action on Climate In “Climate Madness” in the Feb. 9 issue, the writer points out that scientists are all but unanimous and that large numbers of people agree: global warming poses a threat to future generations.

Real Science Wolfgang Pauli, the Nobel Prize winning Austrian-born theoretical physicist, was known not only for his work in postulating the existence of the neutrino but feared for his razor-edged humor.

 
Monday, March 9, 2015

Michigan’s Craft Beer Explosion Leads To New University Programs

Features Patrick Sullivan This boom means something exciting where career paths are concerned: more people are needed to brew beer. Previously, would-be brewers in the Midwest were limited to opportunities at the Siebel Institute of Technology in Chicago and the Master Brewers Association of the Americas in Madison, Wisconsin.
 
Saturday, September 26, 2015

Letters 09-28-2015

Letters

Adult Science Literacy In Trouble Adult science literacy in America is in real trouble, when more adults know who Juan Pablo (the latest from Bachelor) than know Dr. Neil DeGreese Tyson (astrophysicist and host of Cosmos). Mainstream media reinforces social drama and romanticizes emotional decisions. What Americans really needs is to think critically and be effective problem solvers...

Just The Facts  Obama is an American citizen. He is a Christian. He’s not taking your guns. He has not destroyed America. Tax cuts for the rich do not trickle down. The U.S. was thrown out of Iraq per a SOFA agreement signed by Bush; Obama did not abandon Iraq...

 
Saturday, January 16, 2016

Author James Rollins' Unique Method

Art Clark Miller A 500-year-old mummy that’s not supposed to be there; solar flares triggering huge natural disasters; a derelict Russian scientific base buried, with many of its secrets, in an iceberg; gun-toting special ops soldiers trained to understand and...
 
 
Close
Close
Close