Letters

Letters 11-24-2014

Dangerous Votes You voted for Dr. Dan. Thanks!Rep. Benishek failed to cosponsor H.R. 601. It stops subsidies for big oil companies. He failed to cosponsor H.R. 1084. There is an exemption for hydraulic fracturing written into the Safe Drinking Water Act. H.R. 1084. It would require the contents of fracking fluids to be publicly disclosed to protect the public health.

Solar Is The Answer There have been many excellent letters about the need for our region, state and nation to take action on climate change. Now there is a viable solution to this ever-growing problem: Solar energy is the future.

Real Minimum Wage In 1966, a first class stamp cost 5 cents and minimum wage was $1.25. Today, a first class stamp is 49 cents, so federal minimum wage should be $11.25.

Doesn’t Seem Warmer I enjoy the “environmentalists” twisting themselves into pretzels trying to convince us that it is getting warmer. Sure it is... 

Topic: had
Monday, June 16, 2014

Gordon Lightfoot is Alive and Well, Thank You Very Much

News of his untimely death has not diminished Gordon Lightfoot’s musical mojo.

Music Ross Boissoneau It was his songs that first gained him notice. Canadian folk-rock duo Ian and Sylvia added his material to their repertoire in the mid-60s. The folk trio Peter, Paul & Mary enjoyed hits with his tunes “Early Morning Rain” and “For Lovin’ Me,” while Marty Robbins topped the country charts with Lightfoot’s “Ribbon of Darkness.
 
Monday, July 28, 2014

A Traverse City Film Festival Oral History

PART II OF II

Features Patrick Sullivan After the success of that first TCFF in 2005, organizers decided to try for a second act. And — critical for downtown Traverse City — they set their sights on taking over the State Theatre, a classic American movie house that had fallen on hard times..
 
Monday, September 15, 2014

Bay Harbor

How It Happened Twenty Years Ago: An Industrial Wasteland Becomes a $1 Billion Resort

Features Patrick Sullivan

For most of the 20th century, the behemoth cement plant south of Petoskey was an economic driver that offered well-paying jobs for generations of workers. After the plant closed in 1980, the property sat idle for years and went into decay, coughing up powdery kiln dust and oozing leachate into the bay. Many saw the parcel’s development potential with its five miles of shoreline on Little Traverse Bay, beautiful views and easy access to Petoskey.

 
 
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